Concurrent Sessions

Monday, April 16, 2018 - 9:30am to 10:45am

LC1: Cost Share: We Can Work It Out!

What is cost share? When should we include it and when should we not include it? How do you come up with the cost share? What if you don't meet the required minimum cost share?

These are some of the questions we'll go over as we learn about cost share and develop a comfort level with including it or refusing to include it if it is not required. But I always thought providing cost share meant we had a pretty good chance of getting funded. Is that not true? Oh no!

Come and share your experiences and learn from others' experiences.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Learn what cost share is and the easiest way to come up with it. 
  2. Learn one way you don't want to cost share. 

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Ellen Zavala, Director of Research Services & Outreach, University of North Carolina at Charlotte

M101: One Big, Happy Family: Strategies for Working Effectively with Others

Work may be more similar to family than you may realize. You’ve got family who want to argue with you over your decisions. You’ve got family who want to come tell you every time something happens, good or bad. You’ve got family who only need you when there’s an emergency. You’ve got family who must have things “just so.” And, then there’s crazy Uncle Larry, who does and says things you never expect.  In order for us to be effective research administrators and leaders we must understand how to work with all of our “family members”. Understanding others’ behaviors can help us to be better communicators, better coaches, and better resolvers of conflict. Utilizing the “Dominant”, “Influencing”, “Steady”, and “Compliance” (DISC) model, this session will discuss some different behaviors people exhibit, how to best work with those people, and how to set boundaries so more meaningful work gets accomplished, even if crazy Uncle Larry decides to show up unannounced.  

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Understand and identify the different behaviors of others and discover practical strategies on how to best communicate with colleagues, supervisors, and administrators.
  2. Practice setting boundaries, as well as gain tips to take back to their organizations for continuous self-development.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Jennifer Easley, CRA, CFRA, Director, Sponsored Projects, Mississippi State University and Darrell Easley, Learning and Development Manager

M102: Proposal Development: Helping Faculty with Content and Process Details

You're a proposal development specialist charged with helping faculty and subject matter experts with content and process details. But what specifics do you share with them? What tools, techniques, and considerations do you provide? How do you coordinate and facilitate the proposal development process in ways that enable the faculty and subject matter experts to concentrate on what they do best--the technical and content areas of the proposal? This Concurrent session will set out those content and process details in an organized, step-by-step plan that encompasses the entire process from identifying a target RFP (and deciding whether it aligns with the team's project vision), to creating a proposal task list and timeline, to finding the other offices and individuals on campus to assist in supplying critical information, to identifying and incorporating partners, to finishing the proposal and submitting it to the sponsor. Additional techniques, strategies, and tools will be solicited from attendees during and after the session.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Participants will be able to explain a comprehensive way to conceptualize the proposal development process, one that enables them to describe specific ways they can assist faculty and subject matter experts in the process.
  2. Participants will identify and take away from this session multiple considerations, techniques, strategies, templates, and tools that can be used in supporting faculty and subject matter experts in proposal development.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Paul Tuttle, MA, Director of Proposal Development, North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University

M103: Grants Management in a Department/Division

This session will discuss issues and tricks related to managing grants from within a department; not a central office. Whether your institution has a central office or not, there are certain things that are just different when you are working on submitting and managing grants from within a department.  The session will cover finding funding sources, pre-award submissions and post-award management of grants. The session will also identify additional ways to provide ongoing support for investigators; including trainees, fellows, associates, staff and faculty researchers. 

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Know the differences and similarities between working in a department versus a central office. 
  2. Learn how to support researchers within a department. 

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Kevin Titus, MBA, Business Director, Cincinnati Children's Hospital

M105: XL Grants and Contracts

Have you ever wondered how to manage an additional $10 or $20 million grant or contract?  Two senior research administrators at Vanderbilt University Medical Center share their experiences managing these extra-large grants and contracts. The next time your PI tells you they are submitting a twelve site U-01 or federal contract you will be equipped with helpful and necessary tools to manage the pre-award and post-award processes for dealing with these mechanisms.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Describe effective tools to support the pre-award phase of extra-large grants and contracts.
  2. Identify tactics to manage the effort, expenses, and overall organization of extra-large grants and contracts after the award is made.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Jennifer Nixon, MBA, CRA, Administrative Officer, Vanderbilt University Medical Center and Colleen Angielczyk, Administrative Officer

M106: Your Research and Development Team: Finding Funding

Presenters’ experience, background and/or education:  Mindali Dean is the program manager of the Research Development Team at Texas Tech University. She has worked in training and research development for over 10 years, training faculty to locate funding opportunities, craft concept papers/abstract formation, create who’s who entries, and develop collaborations for multidisciplinary teams in the academic, business, and research worlds.  Abstract: With classes, meetings, and funding and submission goals, faculty researchers can be overwhelmed, resulting in fewer grant or concept paper submissions.  But Research Development offices can help reach university goals by supporting faculty in finding appropriate funding opportunities. Meeting with faculty one-on-one and walking through the best approaches to locating funding that meets their project expectations. This session will discuss the successful avenues that research development professionals use to assist their faculty in finding funding sources.  This will be an interactive session.  

Goals of session:  Participants will be introduced to simple methods that can increase an RD office’s reach across campus, without requiring a significant amount of time.  Participants will learn how to help faculty find appropriate funding opportunities and identify audiences. Contribution to conference theme of Resilience in a Shifting Research Landscape: Resilience is the capacity to recover quickly from difficulties; toughness. This session provides an interactive opportunity for participants to learn and share in new, effective learning measures to assist faculty in becoming more competitive.  

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Show faculty how to find appropriate funding for their projects.
  2. Communicate with faculty about their project needs.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Mindali Dean, Program Manager Research Development, Texas Tech University

Monday, April 16, 2018 - 11:00am to 12:15pm

LC2: Journal of Research Administration Chat

Come and drop in to learn more about the Journal of Research Administration!

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Understand the mission of the Journal of Research Administration.
  2. Learn how to submit an article to the Journal of Research Administration.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Lisa Walker, Assistant Dean for Research Operations, HHS Research Office, University of North Carolina at Greensboro

M104: Human Gene Transfer Research and Institutional Biosafety Committees (IBCs): An Introduction

Gene therapy is a quickly growing area of research as the U.S. and other countries have begun issuing approvals. Recent regulatory changes, scientific advances and demographics have combined to create ideal conditions for a boom in gene therapy research, particularly in oncology. Gene therapy studies receiving federal funds or taking place at sites receiving federal funds, federal requirements call for review by both an institutional review board (IRB) and an institutional biosafety committee (IBC) prior to registering with the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Further review may be required by the NIH Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee (RAC). In this presentation, Schulman IRB’s Director of Biosafety Services Daniel Eisenman will provide an introduction to the field of gene therapy research and discuss the IBC’s role in ensuring research involving genetic engineering is conducted safely and responsibly.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Define the federal requirements and oversight structure governing research involving recombinant DNA and gene transfer.
  2. Explain the role and functions of the IBC and describe types of studies which might require IBC review.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Daniel Eisenman, PhD, RBP, SM(NRCM), CBSP, Director, Biosafety Services, Schulman IRB

M201: Leadership Assessment and Development for Research Administrators

The climate in today’s research organization is about performance and results. Do you have the skills and influence to get team members to the next performance goal or benchmark? Effective leadership requires proper visioning to execute essential leadership skills and behaviors. This session will discuss a contemporary leadership theory and principles behind motivation, shared vision, job satisfaction and the effects on performance. This session will examine organizational leadership attributes and behaviors, as well as, diving into leadership skill development while building your own personal leadership strategy. Participants will have an opportunity to complete an experiential exercise during this session.

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Build your personal leadership strategy.
  2. Evaluate your own leadership strengths and weaknesses.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Philip Cola, PhD, Associate Professor of Management, Design & Innovation Organizational Behavior, Associate Director, Academic Affairs Doctor of Management Programs, Weatherhead School of Management, Case Western Reserve University and Adrienne Dumke, MBA, Conflict of Interest Specialist, University of Louisville

M202: Foundation Funding - Is It Enough, Easy, and Worth It?

Everyone needs to diversify their research funding. This workshop will concentrate specifically on finding appropriate foundations for funding. We’ll discuss differences in terminology, foundations’ different approach to indirect costs, and maintaining good relationships. Foundation staff that hold the proverbial purse strings will be on hand to discuss their practices, give tips, and offer actionable suggestions to make your proposal successful, while at the same time, help the foundations fulfill their mission. Whether your institution is rich or poor, in healthcare or agriculture, this session will help you be better prepared to seek and secure foundation funding.

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify possible sources of foundation funding.
  2. Know the differences between a foundation grant and a government grant.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Kevin Titus, MBA, Business Director, Cincinnati Children's Hospital

M203: Indirect Cost Rates – A Non-Profit Perspective

Almost every research institution must engage in the process of negotiating federal indirect rates. Non-profits face unique challenges in preparing, submitting and negotiating indirect rates. As we go through this process, many of us often wonder if we’ve done everything we can do within the constraints of federal regulations in order to maximize our institution’s negotiated indirect rate and resulting indirect cost recovery. In this session, we will discuss strategies that may be employed to maximize indirect cost recovery, both in the preparation of your indirect rate proposal as well as during the subsequent rate negotiation and budgeting of indirect costs on grants and contracts. Participants will be encouraged to share their experiences concerning the indirect rate process. We will also discuss the impact that the new Uniform Guidance will have on preparing and negotiating indirect rates and what participants are doing to prepare for these changes.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify what an indirect cost rate is, its importance and the various types of costs recovered through the indirect rate.
  2. Explore different types of rates and how they impact recovery and understand the process for preparing, submitting and negotiating the rate under the Uniform Guidance.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Alex Weekes, CPA, Principal, ML Weekes & Company, PC

M205: Transferable Skills: The Key to Strong Research Administration

Learn to recognize how transferable skills can create a workplace that is fluid, cohesive and successful. Build a strong Research Administration team by learning how to identify and use transferable skills of potential and current employees. Be prepared to get hands-on in this interactive workshop!

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify their transferable skills in themselves.
  2. Identify transferable skills in team members and through the interview process.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Maria Dahn, PMP, CSM, Pre-Award Program Manager and Maria Harding, Grants Program Manager, University of Notre Dame

M206: NSF Proposal Submissions from a Research Administrator and Primary Investigator Perspective

This session is for those new to the research administration field or those who are new or relatively inexperienced with submitting National Science Foundation proposals. We'll review how to start a proposal, the common tabs that entries are made in (or files loaded) and their requirements, and overview the submission process. We'll close by discussing some info on actions like Collaborative proposals, Letters of Intent, Updates, Withdrawals and Revisions. We'll touch on avoiding submission issues and common problems throughout the session.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify common elements of a complete proposal for a successful NSF submission.
  2. Implement strategies to avoid or correct common issues and problems that impact the submission process. 

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

M. Fran Stephens, CRA, Proposal Development Specialist, University of Oklahoma 

Monday, April 16, 2018 - 2:15pm to 3:30pm

LC3: Contract Case Study - A Guided Discussion of Risk, Solutions and Consent

Participants will review the contract case studies, try to identify problematic clauses, conduct a risk assessment with a tool provided and discuss with others in the session. Presenter will facilitate the discussion so participants can share their alternative clauses; pose questions to take a deeper dive into potential contractual risks and the how clauses are interconnected; share other alternative language options; discuss when and how to do an informed consent for contracts with risk that exceeds the institutional threshold.

Session will be tailored based on the number of participants, their skill set and other needs they've identified. 

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Conduct a risk assessment, identify problematic terms and conditions and identify which clauses impact each other.
  2. Determine when the risk exceeds the institutional threshold and implement an informed consent process.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Heather Winters, BS, Senior Director, Research and Sponsored Programs, University of Memphis

M301: Time Management - So Much to Do, So Little Time

Why does it seem like the never is enough time in a day to do all the things that you need to do! This session will discuss the concept of time and look at some techniques and best practices to manage time.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Obtain some tools to manage time/projects better.
  2. Review self-care and time management techniques.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Domenica Pappas, CRA, Director, Sponsored Research and Programs, Illinois Institute of Technology

M302: From Proposal Submission to Award Acceptance

The journey from proposal submission to award acceptance can be straight forward or a circuitous route. Often the negotiation of agreement terms is the biggest hurdle. A pre-award administrator must be familiar with a variety of agencies and a myriad of problematic agreement terms. This interactive session will identify several troublesome clauses, offer negotiation strategies, and provide tips and tricks to ensure successful award execution.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Participants will be able to Identify troublesome clauses.
  2. Participants will learn negotiation strategies.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Andrea Deaton, CRA, Associate Vice President for Research and Executive Director, Office of Research Services, University of Oklahoma

M303: Basics of F&A – A University Perspective

Colleges and universities receiving direct federal awards are typically required to prepare, submit and negotiate a facilities and administrative (“F&A”) cost rate in order to receive reimbursement for indirect costs. For most people, the F&A calculation appears overly technical and painfully detailed. This session is intended for anyone who is new to the F&A process or would simply like to better understand the basic requirements, inputs and objectives that make up this calculation. Discussion session will include a high-level perspective regarding how the regulations, financial and other data inputs, and submission and negotiation processes work together and will provide practical insight into the application of the F&A rate to the organization’s awards. We will also discuss the impact the new Uniform Guidance will have on preparing and negotiating F&A rates and what participants are doing to prepare for these changes.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify what an F&A rate is, its importance and the various types of costs recovered through the F&A rate.
  2. Explore different types of rates and how they impact recovery and understand the process for preparing, submitting and negotiating the rate under the Uniform Guidance.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Alex Weekes, CPA, Principal, ML Weekes & Company, PC

M304: Using Research Performance and Productivity Data to Maximize Research Proposal Competitiveness

In many disciplines the need to successfully compete for external research funding has never been greater and never so challenging. Numerous high quality proposals are often submitted to the same funding source. The percentage of proposals being funded may reach to the single digit level. Small differences in these proposals can be the difference between success and failure. Among these is the objective and data-driven analysis of the research topic, detailed analysis of the individual and collective capabilities of the research team, and more recently the data management and sharing plans. Increasingly, though the appointment and assistance of proposal development and support teams that have the ability to provide this data and analysis to the researchers the odds of success can be significantly increased. 

Content level: Advanced

Learning objectives:

  1. To have the ability to recognize the potential and develop strategies that can significantly increase the odds that research proposals will be funded.
  2. How to find and assemble data, under take the necessary analysis, and construct graphics that gives research proposals a competitive advantage for funding.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Charity Elifritz, Customer Consultant, Elsevier 

M305: Merging Pre- and Post-award Research Administration – The “Cradle to Grave” Approach

With the advent of shared service models and task-focused research administration, a rarer commodity in the University setting is a “cradle to grave” administrator – the individual that merges both pre- and post-award worlds in their everyday work. This presentation will provide an overview of the “cradle to grave” concept, describe how your research team/unit can benefit from this approach, and identify how to successfully implement and integrate these worlds together for your own career as well as for your staff or unit. Commons pitfalls to avoid during this transition, along with career development insights, will be discussed to provide attendees an idea of how this concept may be of use to their career, their team, and their organization as a whole.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Describe the concept of "cradle to grave" research administration and its overall benefits to a research unit.
  2. Identify how to implement and integrate pre- and post-award worlds together for you, your staff, or your research unit.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Nicholas Prieur, BA, Research Process Manager, University of Michigan

M306: Gift or Grant: Researchers, Sponsored Programs and Development Working Together in Harmony

Research Administrators and Development Officers not only have their own understanding of "What is a gift?" and "What is a grant?" but their respective offices have different missions and goals, and they each bring unique strengths and perspectives to the table. Add to this mix the researcher who just wants to secure funding for his/her project and the gift vs. grant problem can create real conflict and dysfunction within an institution. This session will explore the long-standing struggle between Gifts and Grants and the offices that administer them. We will discuss the problems and challenges, and offer strategies for working together in peace and harmony. The presenter will share the successful and mutually beneficial working relationship that she has developed with her counterpart in Development. Participants will be encouraged to share the experiences they have had at their institutions, as well as any successes and/or failures for navigating the gift vs grant situation.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Understand the key differences between a gift and a grant.
  2. Recognize the strengths and perspectives held by researchers, sponsored programs and development officers on the topic of gifts vs grants, and implement strategies to improve communication  and collaboration between the three stakeholders.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Anne Schauer, MA, CRA Director of Research and Sponsored Programs, Miami University

Monday, April 16, 2018 - 3:45pm to 5:00pm

M401: Yes We Can: Establishing a Community of Practice to Facilitate Research Administration

This session will focus on how to establish and sustain a community of practice centered around communication and cooperation across university departments and schools to facilitate effective and informed research administration practices. This session will provide a case study example of on-going efforts to establish a community of practice in a large research university. The discussion will also include efforts at other universities to establish such communities. Interactive exercises will allow for audience engagement and discussion of relevant issues.  In addition, the session will discuss challenges faced by administrators given seemingly constant changes in policies, procedures, and research personnel. Having this discussion adds value to the practice of research administration because effective communication and collaboration is a growing expectation among research sponsors, researchers, and administrators. Being able to work with and across university departments is an essential practice given strained resources and demands. Single PI projects are becoming scarce and are being replaced by multi-PI, multi discipline, multi-site projects requiring a high degree of cooperation.

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify and describe at least three important elements needed for establishing and sustaining community of practice within their institutions.
  2. List three strategies for effective cooperation and communication across departments and schools at their institutions.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Jose Alcaine, PhD, MBA, CRA, Research Coordinator, Virginia Commonwealth University

M402: Electronic Research Administration (eRA) Overview/Submission Technologies

This session offers some explanation and discussion on what electronic research administration (eRA) is and a historical overview of eRA. Features to consider when establishing the eRA framework of an organization are reviewed and system-to-system interfaces will be touched on. Funding development tools such as Research.gov, Grants.gov, Foundationcenter.org, etc. that assist in locating and submitting to funding will be mentioned. Common electronic submission systems such as Grants.gov and National Science Foundation (NSF) Fastlane will be overviewed including strategies and tips for successful submissions.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify key features of common electronic proposal submission systems relevant to pre-award processes.
  2. Understand general expectations of major federal electronic submission programs such as Grants.gov and NSF Fastlane.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

M. Fran Stephens, CRA, Proposal Development Specialist, University of Oklahoma

M403: Project Close-out: Let's Get It Done

Close-out does not need to be difficult.  Learn some effective steps to take prior to close-out to be successful.  Review roles and responsibilities during the close out process.   Openly discuss closing out different types of awards at your institution.   

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Steps to take to close-out a project.
  2. Roles and responsibilities of the close-out team.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Jason Claes, MBA, MSM, GRCRA, Assistant Director, University of Cincinnati and Amy Roberts, BS, CRA, Director, Special Funds Accounting, Appalachian State University

M404: Export Controls: Beyond the Basics

The session will provide a review of export and sanctions issues that can arise and are better dealt with earlier, rather than later when compliance problem occurs. Using case studies involving Export Administration Regulations (EAR), International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), and Foreign Asset Control Regulations (FACR).  The session will also explore actual compliance problems, and how to deal with the issues.  

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Have a better understanding of US export control mechanism and its implications on research activity. 
  2. Be able to understand the implications of export regulations on a larger scale, including financial, legal and policy levels. 
  3. Provide examples of the types of activities that may be impacted. 
  4. Outline how you can identify export control issues and exemptions. 

Prerequisites: General knowledge of research administration with some experience dealing with export and sanctions related issues.

Speaker(s):

Carpantato (Tanta) Myles, MSM, CIM, CIP, Director & Research Compliance Officer, The University of Alabama

M405: Designing a Meaningful and Helpful Onboarding Program for New Researchers

We have developed a unique, research-specific orientation that helps get research faculty engaged with research on their first day. It is intended to help get established investigators up to speed as quickly as possible and provide them with a sense of community with the larger organization. This “how-to” will give you the tools to create a systematic, research-specific orientation program at your home institution. The orientation program has four aims: 1) increase new researcher productivity, 2) improve retention rates of new faculty by helping them become involved and connected, 3) provide audience-specific, in-depth, timely information that is useful and memorable, and 4) reduce redundant conversations while guaranteeing the delivery of high-quality, consistent, and accurate information. Prior to their start date, faculty will receive a web survey designed to communicate the scope of their research and logistical needs. Based on this information, they will receive personalized quick-start guides, key introductions, and logistical setup within their first 10 days. Then, faculty will be able to explore deeper dive courses and training sessions that are audience-specific, in-depth, and up-to-date. Lastly, we’ll teach you how to setup a Triage Unit to respond to just-in-time training as faculty setup their first research projects. This structured orientation program is competency-based through mentorship and classroom-setting lectures. Our “How-To” will provide detailed information and handouts on how to build an orientation program with consistency and continuity at your home institution. 

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify the elements of a successful faculty onboarding program. 
  2. Analyze the needs for a researcher onboarding program at their home institution.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Holly Zink, MSA, Manager, Research Project Development and Education, Children's Mercy Hospital

M406: The Fundamentals of Non-federal Sponsored Research: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

This session will briefly describe the major differences between federal and non-federal research sponsors, then delve deeper into the common requirements from non-federal sponsors, including clinical trials.  It will review best practices for the pre-award process in order to create an accurate template for post-award accounting.  The presenters encourage interactive discussion of experiences of member institutions.  The take-away goal is to equip you with resources and a network of professionals to consult with when you have an issue, so as to prevent ‘the ugly’!

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify common components of non-federal (i.e. commercial, pharmaceutical or foundation) sponsor submissions.   
  2. Review best pre-award practices to prevent post-award ugly.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Cheryl Bowie, Pre-Award Research Administrator III, Emory University and Lashundra Kirkland, Pre-Award Manager, School of Medicine, Emory University 

Tuesday, April 17, 2018 - 8:30am to 9:00am

R1: Train Them Early for Success: Training New/Younger Faculty

The focus of this discussion is to provide ideas on the importance of and steps to provide new and younger faculty with the proper submission process of funding opportunities.  Train them young and train them smart.  This will be an interactive discussion with participants role playing how to work with new and younger faculty.  Participants will share in their experiences with how their roles are changing to assist more faculty and discuss what other institutions, universities, colleges do to further help faculty with the submission process.  

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Know the best time to meet with new and younger faculty.
  2. Train new and younger faculty on the submission process for funding opportunities.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Mindali Dean, Program Manager RD, Texas Tech University 
Beverly Morehouse, Sponsored Projects Specialist, Stephen F. Austin State University 

R2: Quality Assurance Program in Human Subjects Research

This roundtable presentation would describe the QA program in clinical research at our health care institution, the policies and procedures that govern the quality monitoring activities, the monitoring schedule including standing and rotating reviews, the dashboard of key quality and compliance metrics with performance scales and the committee that oversees the QA program.

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify the purpose of a QA program in human subjects research.
  2. List key quality and compliance metrics for human subjects research.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Nina Garlie, PhD, Director, Aurora Health Care

R4: Export Controls: Beyond the Basics

Institutions are increasingly accepting export controlled work or have researchers who would like to do controlled work. Even those institutions who will not accept controlled work must be careful not to accept language in contracts that could push a project into the realm of controlled work and must be diligent in monitoring projects with the potential to evolve into work that would be controlled. But where are the lines crossed? It starts with reviewing a solicitation and proposal to identify potential risks, paying close attention to contract or even grant language that can bump you into export controlled territory; and the evolving nature of research that is not always certain. The roundtable discussion will provide practical advice and checklists to assess when research might be controlled and how to manage the ongoing data security that outlives the sponsored funding. The roundtable discussion is intended to be interactive with ample time allowed for asking questions.

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Recognize common solicitation, contract and grant language that can nullify the Fundamental Research Exclusion Assess ongoing projects for risk of export compliance.
  2. Identify the types of research activities that may evolve from fundamental to controlled.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Susan Sedwick, PhD, CRA, Senior Consultant, Attain LLC

R5: Business Development Funnels: An Update

In a time of smaller numbers of funding opportunities representing smaller dollar figures, NC A&T initially named a figure more than 50% higher than its current awards/year as its university‐wide strategic plan's 5‐year target for research productivity. Given the pressure to move the needle quickly, and given typical success rates (10‐15% for many Federal programs), the Vice Chancellor of Research and Economic Development has explained to staff and researchers that the institution needs far more proposals in the hopper than there are at present‐‐basically, a "business development funnel" that inputs a tremendous number of high‐quality proposals in order to obtain real increases in award numbers and dollar figures.  The Division of Research and Economic Development has already rolled out a logic model, a template for obtaining information from faculty, and examples of individual and collective strategic funding plans that are helping us be more deliberate and intentional in growing our institution's "business development funnel." After two years, I have data and lessons learned regarding the success of this "business development funnel" idea‐‐not only with the overall institution, but also with schools/colleges, departments, center/institute directors, and individual faculty. In this roundtable discussion, I will present these data and lessons learned as an update on this process.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Participants will be able to describe how NC A&T implemented its "business development funnel" concept at the macro and micro levels during its first two years.
  2. Participants will be able to take home strategies and tools to use in implementing comparable initiatives at attendees' home institutions.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Paul Tuttle, MA, Director of Proposal Development, North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University

R6: What is RA as a Profession? Strategic, Managerial, Operational, Assisting, Other

Coming soon... 

Content level: TBD

Learning objectives:

Coming soon... 

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Holly Zink, Research Project Management and Education Manager, Children's Mercy Hospital

R7: Speaking Effectively to a PI Even When You are Married to One

There are many times through our communications when we wonder if the Principal Investigator (PI) doesn't understand our role as Research Administrators and vice-versa. This session will provide insight on how to communicate effectively to a PI as well as how we can train our PI's to communicate so that we can support them.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Decode the science language and how to effectively communicate to their PIs.
  2. Provide a basis of support to affectively work with each other.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Jason Claes, MBA, MSM, GRCRA, Assistant Director, University of Cincinnati 

R8: Women Leaders in Research Administration: Lessons Learned

During this roundtable discussion, we will share career advancement lessons learned from women leaders in research administration during panel discussions held at the 2017 SRAI Southern/Midwest Section Meeting in Nashville and 2017 SRAI Annual Meeting in Vancouver.  

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Gain insight into how to advance your career path in research administration.
  2. Learn some tools/strategies to advance your career path in research administration.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Tammy Good, MSM, CRA, CPRA, Associate Director of Finance, Indiana CTSI, Indiana University School of Medicine and Sikirat Tijani, MRA, CRA, Associate Director, Grants and Contracts, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

R9: Being a Change Agent in an Anti-Change Environment

In this Roundtable, we will discuss how to help your subordinates and colleagues adapt to fast changes in research administration, by focusing on the bigger picture and what the ultimate outcome needs to be.  We will brainstorm strategies to getting those who use the "we've always done it this way" approach to solve their daily work problems -- in the end to help them realize there is a more efficient way to handle research administration tasks.

Content level: All Levels

Learning objectives:

  1. Participants should leave discussion learning one new technique to assist with facilitating change.
  2. Have a clearer understanding how to decipher what processes should we push to change and which ones may be okay at "status quo".

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Heather K. Hazzard, Business Manager, Department of Biomedical Engineering (BME), Institute for Quantitative Health Science & Engineering (IQ)

R10: Excellence at All Costs: Assuring Stewardship in the Research Administration Zone

With the ever-growing demand for the leanest operations in organizations, and the also growing increase in project-specific reporting and regulatory compliance expectations, a key factor in the life of the research administrator remains a focus on stewardship and maintaining excellence while making sure work gets done.  This round table discussion will explore the challenges research administrators face in aspiring to be best-in-class employees, while discussing strategies to provide quality support and stewardship that is also lean and productive.

Content level: All Levels

Learning objectives:

  1. Collectively explore and identify the quality factors in services provided by research administrators.
  2. Discuss and brainstorm individual strategies that RAs can utilize to retain excellence in service while focusing on work completion and productivity.
  3. Reinforce the key principals of stewardship for research administrators regardless of current pressures in workloads, increased requirements from sponsors, and more

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Meenu Baxendale, Research Process Coordinator, University of Michigan 

Tuesday, April 17, 2018 - 9:00am to 10:15am

CANCELLED: T102: The Full Service Pre-award Approach to Winning Grants

This session will describe a comprehensive, full-service approach to pre-award (proposal development) services that can improve grant proposal win-rates. Research administrators, managers, and faculty engage throughout the entire proposal development process -- from the decision to bid, all the way to proposal submission. This approach incorporates market intelligence, donor knowledge, process management, budgeting, editorial services, and coordination with sponsored programs offices. The resulting integrated proposal teams include staff and faculty working hand-in-hand to produce outstanding proposals with high success rates.  

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. List and describe the full suite of comprehensive  pre-award services.
  2. Evaluate the benefits and challenges of a “comprehensive” pre-award approach, and plan how to incorporate the approach in their own work.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Karin Dillon, MA, Proposal Administrator, Michigan State University

LC5: Central IRB 101: An Introduction to Working with External IRBs

As federal mandates for centralized IRB review begin to take effect, many institutions are faced with the challenge of working with an external IRB for the very first time. In this presentation, Maria Stivers, Manager of Institutional Services at Schulman IRB, guides institutions through the basics of working with a central IRB for the first time. Maria will draw on her current experiences liaising between Schulman's IRB and institutional clients, as well as her past experience leading a university research compliance program, to provide insights into the central IRB relationship and what institutions should expect of their external IRB partners.   While the presentation will use examples from Schulman IRB to illustrate certain points, this webinar is intended as a general, educational introduction to working with an external central IRB.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Explain roles and responsibilities for the central IRB and relying institutions.
  2. Describe typical steps in establishing working relationship with the external IRB.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Maria Stivers, MS, CIP, Director, Institutional Services, Advarra

T101: Launching STOP within your organization

The session will take a look at the STOP principles and how understanding them and acting on them will improve your overall interaction with others and minimize work related stress, that tends to follow us home.  

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify factors that are contributors to work related stress. 
  2. Take action by employing several of the techniques identified to minimize work/life related stress. 

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Gloria Greene, MA, CRA, Director, Office of Sponsored Programs, The University of Alabama in Huntsville

T103: Advanced Cost Share Concepts: Opportunities for Leveraging in Collaborative Research

This session will explore creative approaches to leveraging in large, multi-partnered research  opportunities. Administrators will learn how, during the pre-award process, to develop a mixed portfolio of contributions, including such offerings as cost share, in-kind and matching support, waivers on indirect costs, imputed indirect costs, and leveraging existing support for individuals in organizations. Strategies will be explored where Research Administrators (RAs) can take the lead and assist investigators in securing funding from internal and external sources. Participants will individually participate in guided practice to "cobble together" leveraged funds to respond to a large collaborative proposal which includes cost share and matching requirements.

Content level: Advanced

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify and understand various opportunities research  administrative leaders consider in cost share and potential leverage resources when responding to large collaborative sponsored research opportunities.
  2. Build a multi-resource model for a hypothetical collaborative opportunity using multiple leveraged resources.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Denise Wynn, MBA, Director, North Carolina Central University

T104: Recent Trends in Research Integrity Investigations

The National Science Foundation (NSF) Office of Inspector General (OIG) is responsible for conducting investigations into allegations of research misconduct and fraud associated with NSF proposals and awards. This talk will outline the basic missions of the OIG and present the details of recent cases our office has investigated. Case studies will include violations of research misconduct regulations, violations of human subject's regulations, peer review violations and fraud. 

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Describe NSF OIG and its role in ensuring research integrity.
  2. Identify trends NSF OIG is seeing in violations of rules, regulations and law.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Aliza Sacknovitz, PhD, CFE, Senior Investigative Scientist, National Science Foundation Office of Inspector General

T105: Good Clinical Practice: A Ground Level View

This presentation will discuss the basic principles of GCP and how they translate to the real world experience of running a clinical trial. 

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify how having the right staff, resources, and processes for their clinical trial are effected by GCP.
  2. Relate all components of GCP to thinking of patient rights and safety first and foremost.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Jeanna Julo, BA, CCRP, Assistant Director, Clinical Data Management & Quality Controls Research Institute, University of Kansas Medical Center

T106: United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) from the University Research Administrator Perspective

The US Department of Agriculture may be one of the most complex federal departments with which research administrators interact.While the department has less agencies than the National Institutes of Health, each individual USDA agency has their own proposal and award processes making submissions and award management no easy task. From the perspective of the university research administrator, the speakers will cover the basics about select research programs, application and review processes and the speakers will discuss their experiences, including mandatory cost-sharing requirements and indirect costs recovery limitations.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Learn basic information about the USDA, its agencies and select core research and education initiatives.
  2. Identify key proposal and award management issues, including potential cost-sharing requirements, indirect cost limitations and compliance risks.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

William Helmrath, MSM, CRA, Grants, Contracts, Subaward Coordinator, University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture and Jane Burns, Assistant Director and Compliance Officer 

Tuesday, April 17, 2018 - 10:30am to 11:45am

LC6: Book Discussion/Review: Catalyzing Research! by Rand Haley

The goal of this learning cafe is to have an interesting and engaging discussion on the book, Catalyzing Research: Research Leaders and the Complex Faculty/Administration Interface by Rand Haley. Mr. Haley uses 20 years of experience to address how research leaders in various organizations can improve and accelerate research at their institutions even when faced with constraints on time, energy, and resources. (Participants are encouraged to read the book prior to attending but it is not required.)

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify strategies for improving faculty and administration interfaces.
  2. Understand perspectives of research leaders and improve ability to support research management and operations.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Cheryl Bowie, Pre-Award Research Administrator III, Emory University

T201: This Isn’t Our First Goat Rodeo

Switching from one institution to another or even changing departments within the same institution is hard enough. But trying to adjust can be difficult because of the new group or organization's processes or idiosyncrasies can be a challenge to grasp. This session will focus on basic practicalities of how adjust with cultural and operational changes all while not feeling stupid.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Adjust to a new environment and learn to survive.
  2. Understand cultural change but still relay on your core basic knowledge.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Jason Claes, MBA, MSM, GRCRA, Assistant Dir. Sponsored Accounting, University of Cincinnati and Jennifer Barrows, Coordinator-Grants and Contracts, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital 

T202: Anatomy of Policy Implementation

We would all like to think that with all the talk of reform at the Federal level, that we should be looking forward to fewer regulations and unfunded mandates but the reality is, that is probably just wishful thinking. Institutions must interpret new regulatory mandates, develop policy and procedures, and identify the roles and responsibilities for compliance. These are sometimes daunting charges. This session will provide an overview of the process using a case study implementation to illustrate the steps that should be taken to effectively meet the regulatory compliance requirement.   

Content level: Advanced

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify the parties who may have a role in meeting compliance requirements and designate roles and responsibilities for compliance.
  2. Conduct a fit/gap analysis to identify data or system needs needed to facilitate an efficient process.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Susan Wyatt Sedwick, PhD, CRA, Senior Consultant, Attain LLC 

T203: Uniform Guidance - The Nuts and Bolts

This presentation gives an overview of the origins and structure of Uniform Guidance, and outlines all the major changes from the previous relevant OMB Circulars. Sections include: New Acronyms and Definitions, Standardization of Data Elements, Subrecipient vs. Contractor Determination, Subrecipient Recipient Risk Assessment/Monitoring/Management, Administrative/Clerical Costs, Compensation - Personal Services. Also covered are Procurement Standards, Conflict of Interest provisions, Cost Sharing, Budget Revisions, and more!

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify the OMB Circulars that were combined to create the Uniform Guidance, and how it's organized.
  2. Understand the basic considerations, cost principles, and audit requirements contained in this federal regulation.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Amy Roberts, BS, CRA, Director, Special Funds Accounting, Appalachian State University

T204: NSF's Responsible Conduct of Research Requirement: Implementation and Best Practices

The National Science Foundation’s Responsible Conduct of Research policy requires that institutions seeking NSF funding have an RCR plan, designate someone to ensure compliance with the RCR requirement, and be able to verify that NSF-supported students and researchers receive RCR training. NSF’s Office of Inspector General conducted a review of approximately 50 institutions’ implementation of their own RCR training in response to NSF’s requirement. The review identified three ways in which institutions may not be in compliance with NSF’s policy and examined how NSF’s guidance resulted in the institutions’ varied interpretations regarding what constitutes an appropriate RCR plan. It also characterized the differences in RCR training observed among institutions, and described practices it felt were worthy of being shared with the broader community. This presentation describes NSF OIG’s review and methodology, provides results of the review, and details the fieldwork observations, with a focus on the best practices identified.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Evaluate your institution's RCR plan against NSF's RCR policy requirements.
  2. Identify best practices for effective RCR training.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Aliza Sacknovitz, PhD, CFE, Senior Investigative Scientist, National Science Foundation Office of Inspector General

T205: Conducting Clinical Research in the Community Hospital Setting

This session will explore the challenges community health systems encounter maintaining a clinical research program. Community hospitals have much to offer by way of clinical expertise, geographical convenience for patients, and sense of community, to name a few. However, when it comes to the management and operations of clinical research many struggle. We will explore the challenges of conducting research in the community hospital setting, offer solutions to address those challenges, and present three case studies which demonstrate the solutions.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify the unique challenges of conducting clinical research in the community hospital setting.
  2. Analyze three clinical research operating models that can be successful depending on organizational preference.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Melinda Muenich, RN, BA, MBA, Director and Nirmala Thevathasan, Director, Huron Consulting Group

T206: National Science Foundation (NSF) Update

This session will cover new developments at the National Science Foundation (NSF) - programs, policies, people and budgets. Senior NSF staff will provide a comprehensive review of what is new and developing at NSF.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Understand how NSF has implemented recent changes to proposal and award policies and procedures.
  2. Learn about new changes to NSF systems including proposal submission modernization and changes to user account management.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Samantha Hunter, Senior Policy Specialist, National Science Foundation

Tuesday, April 17, 2018 - 1:45pm to 3:00pm

LC7: Strategies for Implementing a Research Administration Training Program

Has your institution been looking at implementing a formal training program for research administrators? Does the task seem insurmountable? This session will provide an overview of Washington University’s agile approach to developing a formal research administration training program with minimal resources. We will share the timeline, process, stakeholders, cost-allocation method, approach, and lessons learned at Washington University and identify how those lessons can be translated to other institutions. 

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify a strategy for implementing a successful research administration training program that serves the needs of both departmental administrators and central offices.
  2. Evaluate which techniques utilized will work best for his/her institution.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Iris Dickhoff-Peper, Manager, Research Administration Training Program, Washington University in St. Louis
Christine Tilley, Department Administrator, Energy, Environmental & Chemical Engineering, Washington University Campus

T302: Pre-award Preparation for Post-award Success

Winning and administering a grant award requires preparation at many levels of an institution. In this session, participants will learn how to guide the investigator through the in-depth planning required for successful proposal preparation and submission. Participants will leave the session with resources for planning and implementing pre-award strategies that relate to successful post-award management.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Explore the essential elements of proposal preparation.
  2. Learn communication and organizational strategies to ease the transition between pre-award preparation and post-award management.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Heather Kraus, MBA, CRA, Senior Manager for Research Administration, University of Michigan and Tabatha Lemke, Manager, Operations, Office of Grants, Sanford Health

T303: Sub-recipient Monitoring

During, this session the presenters will cover the roles and responsibilities of organizations that pass federal funds through to sub-recipients and outline some related best practices. 

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. What Is a Sub-recipient? Only sub-recipients—not contractors, which used to be called vendors under previous guidance—are subject to the monitoring requirements outlined in the new guidance. For that reason, it’s imperative to understand the distinctions between the two.
  2. Pass-Through Entity Responsibilities - All sub-recipients, regardless of award size, must be monitored under Subpart D of the uniform guidance, understanding the pass-thru entity responsibilities. 
  3. Risk Assessments - A pass-through entity should assess the risk of a sub-recipient’s noncompliance with federal statutes, regulations, and the terms and conditions of the subaward at the outset of the relationship and at least annually afterward. 

Prerequisites: TBD

Speaker(s):

Gina Hedberg,  Executive Director, Office of Sponsored Programs Administration, University of South Alabama and Gloria Greene, MA, CRA, Director, Office of Sponsored Programs, The University of Alabama in Huntsville 

T304: What to Know About External Interests in Research

We call them Conflicts of Interest, but research institutions applying for and receiving Public Health Service (PHS) funding must collect external interest disclosures to make determinations about undue influence. This process can be cumbersome and the requirement can seem repetitive to investigators. This presentation will look at the current obstacles in maintaining compliance with conflict of interest regulations and policies, as well as, provide suggestions for establishing proactive communication, institutional shared vision and relational capacity through administrative feedback loops regarding the disclosure of external interests. Session attendees will participate in an experiential exercise and engage in discussion of their experiences.

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Confront challenges in conflict of interest management through real world examples and discussion.
  2. Identify ways to overcome obstacles in conflict of interest management through shared vision and relational capacity and communications.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Philip Cola, PhD, Associate Professor of Management, Design & Innovation Organizational Behavior, Associate Director, Academic Affairs Doctor of Management Programs, Weatherhead School of Management, Case Western Reserve University and Adrienne Dumke, MBA, Conflict of Interest Specialist, University of Louisville

T305: Using Philanthropy to Support Research

Learn the benefits and important differences in securing and using philanthropic gifts to support research. Hear from an experienced fundraiser, and current research administrator, how to secure millions in gifts to support important research. We will review simple steps to foster an environment of gift-supported research at your institution; large or small. Learn what needs to happen to cultivate new and existing donors and how to partner philanthropic funding opportunities with research priorities. We will discuss engaging your faculty, physicians and other staff in philanthropy. Guidelines for distinguishing between gifts and grants will also be shared.   Unless your research program is blessed with a fully-funded endowment producing perpetual income sufficient to sustain and grow your research or you’re 100% confident you will be fully funded by the government, then you need to attend this session. This practical session will provide tips to use right away and in the long-term.  

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Understand how to link and support research needs with philanthropic opportunities.
  2. Understand the distinction between a sponsored program grant and a philanthropic gift.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Kevin Titus, MBA, Business Director, Cincinnati Children's Hospital

T306: Federal Demonstration Partnership (FDP) Update

The Federal Demonstration Partnership (FDP) is an important organization to research administration. The FDP is an association of US federal agencies; academic research institutions, with administrative, faculty and technical representation and research policy organizations that work to streamline the administration of federally sponsored research. FDP members of all sectors cooperate in identifying, testing and implementing new, more effective ways of managing federal research grants, with the goal of improving the productivity of research without compromising its stewardship. This session will include a brief summary of past, current and planned initiatives of the FDP followed by questions and open discussion.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Participants will be able to describe the mission of the FDP.
  2. Participants will be able to describe the current activities and initiative of the FDP.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Andrea Deaton, CRA, Associate Vice President for Research and Executive Director, Office of Research Services, University of Oklahoma

WEBINAR: T301: National Institutes of Health (NIH) Update

Don’t miss this opportunity to hear about what is new and being developed within the National Institute of Health's (NIH) programs, policies, and budgets.  In this comprehensive review participants will learn about the newest policy updates and how their respective institutions may be impacted. Upon completion of the presentation, participants will have the opportunity to ask questions about new and existing policies and procedures.  Topics include recent and upcoming changes to NIH policy, compliance requirements, and so much more!

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Participants will learn about NIH's budget priorities.
  2. Participants will learn about new policies and compliance initiatives.
  3. Participants will gain insight into current issues at NIH.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Samuel Ashe, Director, Division of Grants Policy, Office of Policy for Extramural Research Administration, National Institutes of Health (NIH) 

Tuesday, April 17, 2018 - 3:15pm to 4:30pm

LC8: Intro to National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Proposals

Thinking about doing a proposal for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and not sure where to start? Come and visit our Learning Cafe! We'll provide an overview of the objectives and organization of NASA that affects the types of funding supported, review some of the common submission requirements and some variations, and discuss some of the unique things you may come across if you are not familiar with NASA proposals or the NSPIRES system.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Learn basic information about NASA, it's divisions and how solicitations are organized.
  2. Describe the requirements for the most common entries in a NASA/NSPIRES submission.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

M. Fran Stephens, CRA, Proposal Development Specialist, University of Oklahoma

T401: Managing a Multi-Generational Diverse Workplace

Why is diversity so challenging for many organizations and leaders? Because it's more comfortable to be with people who think and act similarly. The confrontational aspect of different viewpoints is complicated and harder to manage. A diverse team provides the opportunity for the unique strengths of each team member to be leveraged. The greater the diversity, the greater the breadth of strengths available. Each diverse team member has strengths that can compensate for the shortcomings or blind spots of other team members.

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Presenters and participants will come away with shared ideas on how to break down cultural barriers.
  2. "How to connect a multi-generational diverse workforce where everyone feels valued, challenged and included. Why organizations that take diversity seriously and implement effective integration strategies have greater success accomplishing optimum employee performance and staff retention".

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Gloria Greene, MA, CRA, Director, Office of Sponsored Programs and Laurel Long, Associate Vice President for Human Resources, The University of Alabama in Huntsville

T402: The Sticking Points of Clinical Trial Agreements

The Sticking Points of Clinical Trial Agreements (Working Title) Each CTA negotiated between a site and a sponsor is unique. However, the same set of sticking point come up over and over again. Significant time in negotiation will be spent on ownership and use of trial data, intellectual property, publications, subject injury, indemnification and liability, and other clauses important to both sides. The Magi and Accelerated Clinical Trial Agreement will be used as models during this presentation. This presentation will seek to: explain certain clauses in CTA form the site and sponsor perspective and Identify best practices to work through “sticking points” 

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Explain certain clauses in CTA form the site and sponsor perspective.
  2. Identify best practices to work through “sticking points".

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Brandon Strickland, JD, Contract and Policy Officer, University of South Alabama

T403: Shared Facilities Rate Calculation

With institutions looking within for expert services and sharing the burden of cost, this session will look at the necessary steps from discovery phase to establishing a rate for a shared facility to be used. What guidance as well as internal processes need to be done in order to make the rate a success and most fitting for both internal and external customers.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Understand the fundamentals of how to set a shared facilities rate.
  2. Process to getting a rate approved.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Jason Claes, MBA, MSM, GRCRA, Assistant Director, University of Cincinnati

T404: Central IRB 101: An Introduction to Working with External IRBs

As federal mandates for centralized institutional review board (IRB) review begin to take effect, many institutions are faced with the challenge of working with an external IRB for the very first time. In this presentation, Maria Stivers, Manager of Institutional Services at Schulman IRB, guides institutions through the basics of working with a central IRB for the first time. Maria will draw on her current experiences liaising between Schulman's IRB and institutional clients, as well as her past experience leading a university research compliance program, to provide insights into the central IRB relationship and what institutions should expect of their external IRB partners. While the presentation will use examples from Schulman IRB to illustrate certain points, this session is intended as a general, educational introduction to working with an external central IRB.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Explain roles and responsibilities for the central IRB and relying institutions.
  2. Describe typical steps in establishing working relationship with the external IRB.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Maria Stivers, MS, CIP, Manager, Institutional Services, Advarra

T405: Beyond the Silos: Better Systems Thinking to Improve Research Administration

Are you pre-award or post-award? Are you research development or compliance? Are you in Central or at the School level? This session will focus on how to better think about research administration from a systems perspective with inputs, processes, and outcomes, which are all interdependent and must work together to achieve efficiencies and advance desired institutional goals. This view, although self-evident, may be a challenge to achieve in practice given the complexities of the research enterprise and given set functional and institutional structures. Just as single PI projects are becoming scarce and are being replaced by multi-PI, multi-discipline, multi-site projects requiring a high degree of cooperation, research administration structures must adapt to support these efforts. This interactive session will provide case study discussions and scenarios to think about these relationships and strategies for achieving efficiencies in research administration. Having a systems-view discussion adds value to the practice of re-search administration because effective communication and collaboration is a growing expectation among research sponsors, researchers, and administrators. Being able to work with and across university structures is an essential practice given strained re-sources and demands, regardless of your department.

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. List two or three strategies for systematic efficiencies given your institutional structure.
  2. List three strategies for effective cooperation and communication across departments and schools at your institution.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Jose Alcaine, PhD, MBA, CRA, Research Coordinator Virginia, Commonwealth University

T406: Significant Immediate Growth: Becoming a Land Grant Institution After 125 Year Delay

Central State University (OH) was designed as an 1890 Land Grant Institution in 2014 after a 125 year delay. The University’s research and other activities doubled within two years from $6 million to $13.5 million. This presentation will discuss the challenges and opportunities associated with the immediate and significant growth.  

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify the challenges of expanding the capabilities of their offices during rapid and immediate growth while providing quality service to current and new clients.
  2. Describe how to develop an efficient working relationship with a major internal client.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Morakinyo Kuti, MBA, CRA, CFRA, Director, Central State University and Tina Castonguay, Grants Manager, Office of Sponsored Programs and Research, Central State University

Wednesday, April 18, 2018 - 9:00am to 10:15am

LC9: What We Can Learn From 10 Examples of Inept, Inappropriate, Inadequate, and/or Inefficient Research Administration Situations

All research administrators have seen and/or experienced instances in which a proposal became a train wreck, an idea fizzled out, or an initiative hit a wall. Because we are so busy, it can be difficult to step back and objectively assess what we can learn from those instances and/or to perceive them within their larger contexts.

Drawing from his experiences working at or with HBCUs, PUIs, research‐intensive institutions, and community colleges, the presenter will offer 10 examples of inept, inappropriate, inadequate, and/or inefficient research administration situations and explain what we can and should learn from them. Examples will address proposal development, research development, research administration management, internal routing and approval, grantsmanship training, institutional cultural change and capacity development, and other current areas of interest. Other examples and/or areas of interest will be discussed with and/or solicited from participants. A summary of these examples and lessons learned will be distributed to participants and other interested parties following the conference.

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Learn (or reinforce) what not to do, by negative example.
  2. Understand how the examples fit into the larger conceptualization of research administration best practices.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Paul Tuttle, MA, Director of Proposal Development, North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University

W101: Overcoming the Imposter Syndrome

The Harvard Business Review describes the Imposter Syndrome as a collection of feelings of inadequacy that persist despite evident success. Imposter Syndrome is characterized by chronic self-doubt and the persistent fear of being exposed as intellectually fraudulent.   This session will consist of a summary of current literature, short video vignettes of those who have experienced this syndrome, and exercises to assist the participants with creating personal strategies to overcome Imposter Syndrome.  Participants will leave self-empowered to become more confident in their current roles and career aspirations.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify if they or others have the Imposter Syndrome.
  2. Create strategies to overcome the Imposter Syndrome.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Tammy Good, MSM, CRA, CPRA, Associate Director of Finance, Indiana CTSI Indiana University School of Medicine and Sikirat Tijani, MRA, CRA, Associate Director, Grants and Contracts Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago

W102: Working with Smaller/Non-traditional Research Departments within Your Organization

There are some departments in organizations that do not traditionally work on research proposals, but perhaps "sponsored projects". This session will look at the challenges, best practices, and systems put in place to help these departments and faculty on their research and sponsored program funding. 

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Learn how to evaluate the challenges facing smaller departments.
  2. Learn techniques to communicate and assist faculty.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Domenica Pappas, CRA, Director, Sponsored Research and Programs, Illinois Institute of Technology

W104: The Sunshine Act (Open Payments), Challenges & Solutions

The Sunshine Act is a part of a government mandate with the Affordable Care Act in 2010, which promotes transparency in financial interactions between pharma/medical device companies and healthcare providers, ensuring the public has access to information about financial relationships between their healthcare providers and manufacturers of drugs and devices. So in lay terms, a research subject can go online to a public website, enter the researcher’s name, and see what pharma/medical device companies they have received transfers of value from. The public wants to know about potential conflicts of interest! On the other side of the coin, researchers have a time period to review what is being reported about them and can review/dispute the information….. but so many do not know this or realize it’s importance! My presentation would include: • The purpose & definition of the mandate (Sunshine Act) • The review process & penalties for non-compliance • The documentation required to back up this information • Who the players are and what the “payments” could be • Open issues and challenges • The impact on researchers and some feedback from them • An example of the website and how it looks • Solution tips and best practices

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Discuss open issues, challenges, and the impact on researchers, regarding the Sunshine Act.
  2. Interpret solution tips and best practices regarding the Sunshine Act for Institutions, Universities/teaching hospitals, Manufacturers (sponsors), and CROs & Vendors.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Jeanna Julo, BA, CCRP, Assistant Director, Clinical Data Management & Quality Controls Research Institute, University of Kansas Medical Center

W106: Spotlight on Sponsors

If you are new to the field and the array of sponsors and differing submission systems seems overwhelming or you don't know where to start in figuring out how to submit to a sponsor-- then this is the session for you. We'll shine a spotlight on many of the major sponsors (federal and non-federal) and highlight some of their requirements, submission systems, and provide some helpful tips.

Note: This is an overview and doesn't include in-depth operating instructions on any one particular system or agency. 

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Understand of some of the many different submission systems used in sponsored projects.
  2. Identify some of the gaps they or their organization may have in sponsor requirements or systems.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

M. Fran Stephens, CRA, Proposal Development Specialist, University of Oklahoma

Wednesday, April 18, 2018 - 10:30am to 11:45am

LC4: SRAI Volunteer Opportunities – How To and Benefits of Getting Involved

Have you thought about engaging more in the Society of Research Administrators International (SRAI) but haven't really got a clear idea of what opportunities there might be or how to get started? We'll discuss volunteer opportunities at conferences, planning meetings, leadership positions, and committees. You'll get ideas on how to dip your toe in the pool or dive in and the many benefits to being involved in your organization.

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify a volunteer activity that they are interested in and how to pursue becoming active (or more active) in SRAI.
  2. Understand the organization of SRAI and the dependance on volunteer support.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Gina Hedberg, Executive Director, Office of Sponsored Programs Administration, University of South Alabama

W201: Let's Talk: Best Practices in Communication and Presentation

Sharing information effectively is a critical skill for research administrators and the research field more broadly.  Our colleagues, project partners, funders, managers, and researchers respond well to clear, compelling ideas, yet presentation skills and resources are not necessarily top-of-mind when we think about our work.  In this session, we will discuss some best practices, some no-cost and low-cost resources, and our favorite presentation and communication tips across several presentation formats.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify best practices in communication and presentation techniques.
  2. Explore resources for effective communication and presentation in several formats.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Kimberly Pratt, MA, CRA, Sponsored Projects Officer, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital

W202: Contracts 101

The landscape of sponsored projects is becoming increasingly complex, extremely competitive and difficult to maneuver. This session provides a high level, introductory overview into the world of contracts by comparing and contrasting the differences between a grant and a contract. The presentation details the differences by breaking down the federal definitions and regulations. Participants will also gain knowledge and understanding of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) structure and basic contracting processes as well as the differences in compliance, budgeting and reporting. Attendees will also learn about the different types of contract and the varying risks associated with contract terms and conditions.  

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify and understand the differences between a contract, grant and gift as well as the legal basis for contracts and grants.
  2. Understand the structure of the FAR and how/when it's used and identify questions to ask to determine the agreement type.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Heather Winters, BS, Senior Director, Research Administration, University of Memphis and Angela Fair, Senior Associate Director, Office of Sponsored Programs, University of Memphis 

W203: Think Like an Auditor

It is the responsibility of all departments and operating units to have in place internal controls that provide for the charging of all costs to the appropriate accounts. Therefore, transferring costs between accounts is considered legitimate only when necessary to correct an error, properly allocate charges between accounts involving closely related work, or redistributing charges in those few cases where the university’s billing systems will not allow for charging the appropriate amount to the proper accounts upon original posting.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Determine whether the cost transfer is allowable.
  2. Determine if the redistribution of charges is equitable between multiple awards.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Valarie King, CPA, Director Contracts & Grants Accounting, The University of Alabama in Huntsville

W204: Effectively Implementing the NIH's IRB Policy and Revised Common Rule

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) released a final policy stating that all domestic sites of multi-site, NIH-funded studies must use a single Institutional Review Board (sIRB) of record for non-exempt human subject research. This policy applies to all competing grant applications (new, renewal, revision or resubmission) with receipt dates on or after January 25, 2018. This session will cover how to operationalize this policy, considerations for an electronic IRB system that can effectively support institutions serving as the IRB of record for multi-site studies, relying on external IRBs as the IRB of record or both and cost considerations. The second part of this session will focus on the revised Common Rule, released by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), which is the first major change to that set of regulations in more than 25 years. Human research protection professionals will be subject to following the revised Common Rule provisions starting on its effective and compliance date, January 19, 2018. This session will review the major changes proposed and approaches for implementation.

*It is noted that there is a potential delay for the revised Common Rule being discussed.  if the delay occurs, we will focus the content of the 2nd part of the session on the impact of the delay, implementation options and strategies to prepare for the new compliance date*

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify 4 core strategies for implementing the NIH sIRB policy and evaluate how their organization is handling the implementation.
  2. List the major changes in the revised Common Rule and best practices when working within both sets of rules.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Philip Cola, PhD, Associate Professor, Design & Innovation Organizational Behavior Associate Director, Academic Affairs Doctor of Management Programs, Weatherhead School of Management , Case Western Reserve University and Madeleine Williams, MA, Senior Consultant, Huron Consulting Group

W205: Metrics that Matter: Assessing Workflow and Staffing

This session will demonstrate how the Pediatric Ontario (Oncology) Protocol Assessment Level (Peds-OPAL) can be adapted as a mechanism for measuring complexity beyond its incipient use for measuring study complexity associated with research coordinator workload. Two case studies will be presented illustrating how assigning complexity scoring can assist is balancing workload, assessing reasonable workloads and justifying new staffing associated with new research foci and strategic goals to increase research funding. Using complexity ratings can help managers more accurately balance workload and assign proposals, awards and clinical studies. Complexity scoring can provide valuable metrics for making the case for additional staffing in response or in anticipation of growth in research but to also make the case for increasing salaries to help in retention of experienced staff. 

Note: This session could be easily adapted for a roundtable discussion but would require 75 minutes to be effective.  

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Develop a ratings matrix for proposals, awards and clinical studies applicable to their institution.
  2. Understand how to use workflow matrix to justify additional positions and increase salaries to retain experience staff.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Susan Sedwick, PhD, CRA, Senior Consultant, Attain LLC and Michele Vaughan, BS, CCRP, Director, Clinical Research Operations for Hem/Onc/BMT; Director, NEXT Consortium, Nationwide Children's Hospital

W206: Electronic Research Administration: Managing NIH Assist & Grants.gov

Don't have an electronic research administration (eRA) systems that provide "system-to-system" capabilities? Still need to submit federal proposals to a wide variety of federal agencies? Presenters will walk participants through an interactive discussion of the NIH Assist and Grants.gov Workspace submissions systems. This session is directed to the intermediate level administrator who may need/elect to submit proposals to NIH using the PHS-specific NIH Assist system and/or the more widely applicable Grants.gov Workspace for federal sponsors.

Presenters will guide attendees through basic information needed to successfully submit proposals in these eRA systems while providing tips and pointers to enhance the end user's experience.

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Participants will be conversant in the submission process, hazards and tips for NIH Access.
  2. Participants will be conversant in the submission process, hazards and tips for Gants.gov Workspace.

Prerequisites: TBD

Speaker(s):

Charna Howson, MA, Director, Sponsored Programs, Office of Research, Appalachian State University and Ellen Zavala, Director of Research Services & Outreach, University of North Carolina at Charlotte