Management and Operations (MO)

Focus is on: delivery of operational services and research and financial compliance programs; facilities management; research infrastructure such as capital programs and building and managing of science and technology parks; human resources and international personnel management; and supporting collaborations with international organizations.

Monday, April 16, 2018

M105: XL Grants and Contracts
Monday, April 16, 2018 - 9:30am to 10:45am

Content level: Basic

Have you ever wondered how to manage an additional $10 or $20 million grant or contract?  Two senior research administrators at Vanderbilt University Medical Center share their experiences managing these extra-large grants and contracts. The next time your PI tells you they are submitting a twelve site U-01 or federal contract you will be equipped with helpful and necessary tools to manage the pre-award and post-award processes for dealing with these mechanisms.

Learning objectives:

  1. Describe effective tools to support the pre-award phase of extra-large grants and contracts.
  2. Identify tactics to manage the effort, expenses, and overall organization of extra-large grants and contracts after the award is made.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Jennifer Nixon, MBA, CRA, Administrative Officer, Vanderbilt University Medical Center and Colleen Angielczyk, Administrative Officer

M205: Transferable Skills: The Key to Strong Research Administration
Monday, April 16, 2018 - 11:00am to 12:15pm

Content level: Basic

Learn to recognize how transferable skills can create a workplace that is fluid, cohesive and successful. Build a strong Research Administration team by learning how to identify and use transferable skills of potential and current employees. Be prepared to get hands-on in this interactive workshop!

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify their transferable skills in themselves.
  2. Identify transferable skills in team members and through the interview process.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Maria Dahn, PMP, CSM, Pre-Award Program Manager and Maria Harding, Grants Program Manager, University of Notre Dame

M305: Merging Pre- and Post-award Research Administration – The “Cradle to Grave” Approach
Monday, April 16, 2018 - 2:15pm to 3:30pm

Content level: Basic

With the advent of shared service models and task-focused research administration, a rarer commodity in the University setting is a “cradle to grave” administrator – the individual that merges both pre- and post-award worlds in their everyday work. This presentation will provide an overview of the “cradle to grave” concept, describe how your research team/unit can benefit from this approach, and identify how to successfully implement and integrate these worlds together for your own career as well as for your staff or unit. Commons pitfalls to avoid during this transition, along with career development insights, will be discussed to provide attendees an idea of how this concept may be of use to their career, their team, and their organization as a whole.

Learning objectives:

  1. Describe the concept of "cradle to grave" research administration and its overall benefits to a research unit.
  2. Identify how to implement and integrate pre- and post-award worlds together for you, your staff, or your research unit.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Nicholas Prieur, BA, Research Process Manager, University of Michigan

M405: Designing a Meaningful and Helpful Onboarding Program for New Researchers
Monday, April 16, 2018 - 3:45pm to 5:00pm

Content level: Intermediate

We have developed a unique, research-specific orientation that helps get research faculty engaged with research on their first day. It is intended to help get established investigators up to speed as quickly as possible and provide them with a sense of community with the larger organization. This “how-to” will give you the tools to create a systematic, research-specific orientation program at your home institution. The orientation program has four aims: 1) increase new researcher productivity, 2) improve retention rates of new faculty by helping them become involved and connected, 3) provide audience-specific, in-depth, timely information that is useful and memorable, and 4) reduce redundant conversations while guaranteeing the delivery of high-quality, consistent, and accurate information. Prior to their start date, faculty will receive a web survey designed to communicate the scope of their research and logistical needs. Based on this information, they will receive personalized quick-start guides, key introductions, and logistical setup within their first 10 days. Then, faculty will be able to explore deeper dive courses and training sessions that are audience-specific, in-depth, and up-to-date. Lastly, we’ll teach you how to setup a Triage Unit to respond to just-in-time training as faculty setup their first research projects. This structured orientation program is competency-based through mentorship and classroom-setting lectures. Our “How-To” will provide detailed information and handouts on how to build an orientation program with consistency and continuity at your home institution. 

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify the elements of a successful faculty onboarding program. 
  2. Analyze the needs for a researcher onboarding program at their home institution.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Holly Zink, MSA, Manager, Research Project Development and Education, Children's Mercy Hospital

Tuesday, April 17, 2018

R7: Speaking Effectively to a PI Even When You are Married to One
Tuesday, April 17, 2018 - 8:30am to 9:00am

Content level: Basic

There are many times through our communications when we wonder if the Principal Investigator (PI) doesn't understand our role as Research Administrators and vice-versa. This session will provide insight on how to communicate effectively to a PI as well as how we can train our PI's to communicate so that we can support them.

Learning objectives:

  1. Decode the science language and how to effectively communicate to their PIs.
  2. Provide a basis of support to affectively work with each other.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Jason Claes, MBA, MSM, GRCRA, Assistant Director, University of Cincinnati 

LC5: Central IRB 101: An Introduction to Working with External IRBs
Tuesday, April 17, 2018 - 9:00am to 10:15am

Content level: Basic

As federal mandates for centralized IRB review begin to take effect, many institutions are faced with the challenge of working with an external IRB for the very first time. In this presentation, Maria Stivers, Manager of Institutional Services at Schulman IRB, guides institutions through the basics of working with a central IRB for the first time. Maria will draw on her current experiences liaising between Schulman's IRB and institutional clients, as well as her past experience leading a university research compliance program, to provide insights into the central IRB relationship and what institutions should expect of their external IRB partners.   While the presentation will use examples from Schulman IRB to illustrate certain points, this webinar is intended as a general, educational introduction to working with an external central IRB.

Learning objectives:

  1. Explain roles and responsibilities for the central IRB and relying institutions.
  2. Describe typical steps in establishing working relationship with the external IRB.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Maria Stivers, MS, CIP, Director, Institutional Services, Advarra

T105: Good Clinical Practice: A Ground Level View
Tuesday, April 17, 2018 - 9:00am to 10:15am

Content level: Basic

This presentation will discuss the basic principles of GCP and how they translate to the real world experience of running a clinical trial. 

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify how having the right staff, resources, and processes for their clinical trial are effected by GCP.
  2. Relate all components of GCP to thinking of patient rights and safety first and foremost.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Jeanna Julo, BA, CCRP, Assistant Director, Clinical Data Management & Quality Controls Research Institute, University of Kansas Medical Center

LC6: Book Discussion/Review: Catalyzing Research! by Rand Haley
Tuesday, April 17, 2018 - 10:30am to 11:45am

Content level: Intermediate

The goal of this learning cafe is to have an interesting and engaging discussion on the book, Catalyzing Research: Research Leaders and the Complex Faculty/Administration Interface by Rand Haley. Mr. Haley uses 20 years of experience to address how research leaders in various organizations can improve and accelerate research at their institutions even when faced with constraints on time, energy, and resources. (Participants are encouraged to read the book prior to attending but it is not required.)

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify strategies for improving faculty and administration interfaces.
  2. Understand perspectives of research leaders and improve ability to support research management and operations.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Cheryl Bowie, Pre-Award Research Administrator III, Emory University

T205: Conducting Clinical Research in the Community Hospital Setting
Tuesday, April 17, 2018 - 10:30am to 11:45am

Content level: Basic

This session will explore the challenges community health systems encounter maintaining a clinical research program. Community hospitals have much to offer by way of clinical expertise, geographical convenience for patients, and sense of community, to name a few. However, when it comes to the management and operations of clinical research many struggle. We will explore the challenges of conducting research in the community hospital setting, offer solutions to address those challenges, and present three case studies which demonstrate the solutions.

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify the unique challenges of conducting clinical research in the community hospital setting.
  2. Analyze three clinical research operating models that can be successful depending on organizational preference.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Melinda Muenich, RN, BA, MBA, Director and Nirmala Thevathasan, Director, Huron Consulting Group

T305: Using Philanthropy to Support Research
Tuesday, April 17, 2018 - 1:45pm to 3:00pm

Content level: Intermediate

Learn the benefits and important differences in securing and using philanthropic gifts to support research. Hear from an experienced fundraiser, and current research administrator, how to secure millions in gifts to support important research. We will review simple steps to foster an environment of gift-supported research at your institution; large or small. Learn what needs to happen to cultivate new and existing donors and how to partner philanthropic funding opportunities with research priorities. We will discuss engaging your faculty, physicians and other staff in philanthropy. Guidelines for distinguishing between gifts and grants will also be shared.   Unless your research program is blessed with a fully-funded endowment producing perpetual income sufficient to sustain and grow your research or you’re 100% confident you will be fully funded by the government, then you need to attend this session. This practical session will provide tips to use right away and in the long-term.  

Learning objectives:

  1. Understand how to link and support research needs with philanthropic opportunities.
  2. Understand the distinction between a sponsored program grant and a philanthropic gift.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Kevin Titus, MBA, Business Director, Cincinnati Children's Hospital

T405: Beyond the Silos: Better Systems Thinking to Improve Research Administration
Tuesday, April 17, 2018 - 3:15pm to 4:30pm

Content level: Intermediate

Are you pre-award or post-award? Are you research development or compliance? Are you in Central or at the School level? This session will focus on how to better think about research administration from a systems perspective with inputs, processes, and outcomes, which are all interdependent and must work together to achieve efficiencies and advance desired institutional goals. This view, although self-evident, may be a challenge to achieve in practice given the complexities of the research enterprise and given set functional and institutional structures. Just as single PI projects are becoming scarce and are being replaced by multi-PI, multi-discipline, multi-site projects requiring a high degree of cooperation, research administration structures must adapt to support these efforts. This interactive session will provide case study discussions and scenarios to think about these relationships and strategies for achieving efficiencies in research administration. Having a systems-view discussion adds value to the practice of re-search administration because effective communication and collaboration is a growing expectation among research sponsors, researchers, and administrators. Being able to work with and across university structures is an essential practice given strained re-sources and demands, regardless of your department.

Learning objectives:

  1. List two or three strategies for systematic efficiencies given your institutional structure.
  2. List three strategies for effective cooperation and communication across departments and schools at your institution.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Jose Alcaine, PhD, MBA, CRA, Research Coordinator Virginia, Commonwealth University

T406: Significant Immediate Growth: Becoming a Land Grant Institution After 125 Year Delay
Tuesday, April 17, 2018 - 3:15pm to 4:30pm

Content level: Intermediate

Central State University (OH) was designed as an 1890 Land Grant Institution in 2014 after a 125 year delay. The University’s research and other activities doubled within two years from $6 million to $13.5 million. This presentation will discuss the challenges and opportunities associated with the immediate and significant growth.  

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify the challenges of expanding the capabilities of their offices during rapid and immediate growth while providing quality service to current and new clients.
  2. Describe how to develop an efficient working relationship with a major internal client.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Morakinyo Kuti, MBA, CRA, CFRA, Director, Central State University and Tina Castonguay, Grants Manager, Office of Sponsored Programs and Research, Central State University