Concurrent Sessions

Monday, March 19, 2018 - 9:30am to 10:45am

M101: The History and Art of Research Administration and Organizational Structures

With changing times and changing funding parameters and regulations, how do we effectively create an administrative infrastructure that is fluid enough to maintain a compliant environment while facilitating the research at your institution? This interactive session will be an exchange of historical perspectives and future visions for research administration and how it impacts your entire research portfolio. Are you seen as a hindrance or a partner in the growth of the research enterprise? Are you able to successfully develop risk assessment measures or are you in a risk adverse environment? What objectives and tools are you using to recruit, train and retain solid research administrators? Where does professional development fit into your organization? Three experienced panelists will share their thoughts and insights with participants.

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Analyze a research organization structure for potential maximization of output.
  2. Illustrate a new vision for the future of research administration roles and responsibilities. 

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Denise Clark, Associate Vice President for Administration, University of Maryland, College Park 
Ann Holmes, Assistant Dean, College of Behavioral and Social Sciences, University of Maryland, College Park 
Dennis Paffrath, MBA, CRA, Assistant Vice President, Research, University of Maryland, Baltimore

M102: Grant Budgeting Basics

Grant Budgeting Basics is intended for research administrators who are new to the budgeting process. We will begin with an overview of the theory behind creating a good budget. The session will include a discussion of the Uniform Guidance as it relates to budgeting, Cost Accounting Standards, Facility and Administrative expense and their impact on budgets. Participants will learn about the various budget categories included in proposal budgets. We will quickly create a very simple budget to illustrate various calculations.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Participants will learn about different budget categories and how to incorporate them into a budget. 
  2. Participants will learn how to prepare a basic budget. 

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Sharon McCarl, Associate Dean for Financial Affairs, Mellon College of Science, Carnegie Mellon University 

M103: Effort Reporting: Understanding the Requirements

Effort reporting is a continual area of focus for Offices of Inspectors General and the Justice Department and is a constant hot topic within the research community. Federal regulations and guidance in this important area are often vague and open to varying interpretations. This session will review recent audit and investigation findings related to effort reporting, discuss common pitfalls/red flags for auditors and offer some best practices on how to avoid them. Among the topics that will be covered in this session are effort reporting fundamentals, as well as some of the more challenging aspects of effort reporting, including what’s in and what’s out of institutional base salary and total professional effort, supplemental compensation, what constitutes a “suitable means of verification” and what exactly is an “independent internal evaluation” of the effort reporting process.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Understand the federal requirements of effort reporting and identify industry best practices for designing and implementing an effective effort reporting process.
  2. Learn what federal auditors and investigators look for when auditing effort reporting and techniques to mitigate risks of non-compliance at your institution.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Dominic Esposito, CRA, Director, Corporate, Foundation and Government Relations, College of New Rochelle
William F. Hoffman, Jr., MAS, Research Administrator, University of Maryland, Baltimore, School of Dentistry

M104: Export Controls for the Broad Research Compliance Leader

Adhering to the U.S. export controls regulations is an essential component of a strong research compliance program for any research center.  Supporting internal compliance measures around export controls is particularly challenging when you have broad responsibility for multiple areas of research compliance.  In this session, we'll ground you in why the U.S. export control regulations exist and walk through the three core sets of federal regulations:  Department of Commerce Export Administration Regulations (EAR), Department of State International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), and the Department of Treasury Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) regulations.  We'll cover the primary aspects of the regulations that intersect with research administration efforts on a weekly basis, such as the fundamental research exclusion, public information, export control classifications, government licensing requirements, denied parties, sanctioned and embargoed countries.  The presentation will show linkages between the multiple areas of research compliance to aid you in implementing practical and effective export controls compliance measures in your organization.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Understand the overall framework behind the U.S. export controls regulations.
  2. Understand key export control considerations for all research compliance programs. 

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Jennifer Saak, PhD, Managing Director, Traliance

M105: Preparing Applications in ASSIST & Workspace

This presentation covers everything from initiating the applications to submitting. Topics include NIH Assist and Grants.gov workspace.

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Prepare and submit National Institutes of Health (NIH) applications in ASSIST.
  2. Prepare and submit Grants.Gov applications in Workspace.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Matthew Barstow,  Senior Sponsored Research Officer, Harvard Medical School

M106: It's Your Cost of Doing Business: Clinical Trial Budget Negotiation Challenges

Clinical trial budgets are always negotiable. Still, many investigators and clinical teams accept original budgets proposed by industry sponsors. The process of budgetary negotiation may seem intimidating, overwhelming, or ungrateful. In reality, negotiation allows both the sponsor and the site to arrive at a consensus which will benefit both sides. With an acceptable budget the site is more likely to fully commit to subject enrollment and site compliance by allocating proper resources and effort, which will result in producing higher quality data. Trial success can be easily compromised when budgets are negotiated poorly or accepted with no negotiation at all. Who is the right negotiator at the site level? How to muster sufficient negotiation power? When to push back and what to forgo? These and other questions will be addressed in the course of the session. The participants will discuss practical negotiation tips and techniques. Actual budget negotiation examples will be used to reveal most common stumbling blocks between sites and sponsors and the ways to circumvent them.

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Utilize various budget negotiation tips and techniques.
  2. Define the role of budget negotiation in trial success.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Vanessa Bryant, Manager, Budget & Finance, University of Utah 

Monday, March 19, 2018 - 11:00am to 12:15pm

M201: Achieving your Career Goals with Continuing Education and Effective Learning Strategies

Effective continuing education is crucial for offices to remain efficient and to develop research administration professionally. In the growing field of research administration there are a variety of continuing education opportunities that fit the different interests and career goals of professionals. This interactive session will help attendees identify professional development opportunities that fit with their career goals. It will then explore retrieval-enhanced learning strategies that attendees can implement as a means of optimizing their professional development. This session is designed for attendees new to the field of research administration as well as those looking for a refresher or ways to revamp their career.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify 1-3 professional development opportunities relevant to the field of research administration and their career goals.
  2. Describe and implement 1-2 effective learning strategies to improve their adult learning.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Cory Davis, MA, CRA, Senior Grants and Contract Specialist, The University of Texas at Austin
Susan Wyatt Sedwick, PhD, CRA, Senior Consultant, Attain, LLC

 

M202: Shared Services for Research Administration: Support for Faculty and Increased Compliance

The increased complexity and changing nature of research administration led us to evaluate the models we use institutionally to provide services to faculty.  This session will look at Yale’s approach to regionalizing research administration services for academic and non-academic departments.  Our organization, Faculty Research Management Services, seeks to raise the level of service to Principal Investigators while increasing compliance and mitigating risk.   This session will review how the current model was designed and implemented on our campus, provide the challenges and successes during the transition, and provide an opportunity to have a discussion about all aspects of this model.

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Evaluate the benefits and challenges associated with implementing this model.
  2. Identify best practices for design, branding and implementation.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Joanne Bentley, MBA, Director, Yale University

M203: COST TRANSFERS: Let's Talk and Maybe We Could Live Without It

Cost transfers are our friends. Cost transfers help “keep us on our toes”. During this presentation, we will build the base of knowledge that we need to determine whether a cost transfer is needed. We will explore several examples and talk about language usage in a cost transfer. The way the words flow can make or break our cost transfer and our patience if we let it. Finally, an exchange of ideas between colleagues is always the best way to learn and not reinvent the wheel. We will explore how in our various spheres we have managed to “tame the dragon” and come out stronger for it.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify basic knowledge. 
  2. Identify good language to write a good cost transfer.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Paulette Jones, MRE, BA, Administrator, University of Montana 

M204: Fact or Fiction? Imaginary Case Studies in Compliance

Join me for an informal story telling journey as we examine case studies that may or may not be based on real life examples. You be the judge!

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Proactively identify compliance issues based on lessons learned from hypothetical case studies.
  2. Appreciate the nuances of the unexpected that may occur during the lifecycle of any research award.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Jeff Seo, JD, Assistant Vice Provost for Research Compliance, Northeastern University

M205: Letters of Intent, White Papers, Preproposals and Other Short Papers

Many grant agencies are beginning to require a short preliminary paper before a full proposal can be submitted. These documents serve multiple purposes in funding agencies but sometimes have little detail on how to prepare them. This session will provide definitions of these types of papers, their multiple purposes, and which funding agencies require them.  The speaker will offer effective strategies to increase chances of funding success with well-developed short papers that meet agency needs.  Agency-specific formats will be illustrated and a template will be provided for use with agencies that do not offer specific instructions.    Participants will have the opportunity to review successful models and examples, ask questions, and share their own experiences. 

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. List the many funding agencies and programs that require these short papers and the multiple purposes they serve.
  2. Describe and apply strategies to develop successful short papers as part of the grant application process and share templates and formats with principal investigators at their institutions.

Prerequisites: Some familiarity with the proposal development process and funding agencies would be helpful.

Speaker(s):

Marjorie Piechowski, PhD, Emerita Director of Research Support, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

M206: Clash of Good Intentions: Integrity and Compliance Issues versus Clinical Trial Operations

The primary goals of research in human subjects should always be integrity and patient safety.  What happens in the business world when you are up against contracts, deadlines, and enrollment goals?  There can sometimes be the perception that integrity and compliance requirements get in the way of getting the job done.  This workshop shares the perspectives of individuals from each role: a research integrity official and someone from the clinical trials office.  Our experience in and appreciation for conducting ethical and sound research while meeting contractual requirements, enrollment goals, and study objectives to improve clinical care will be shared with attendees.  We will discuss situations where it appears that integrity and compliance issues will conflict with the operations of a clinical trial and offer solutions.  In a dynamic dialogue, we will all learn together that each paradigm can exist and a clinical trial can be most successfully managed when integrity and compliance issues are imbedded in the day-to-day operations of a research study.  

Content level: Advanced

Learning objectives:

  1. Describe common areas where integrity and compliance requirements are commonly perceived to inhibit successful clinical trial operations.
  2. Identify ways to operationalize these requirements into clinical trial operations to meet ethical considerations, compliance requirements, and good standards in research for a successful clinical trials research program.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Tonya Edvalson, CCRP, CHRC, Clinical Research Compliance Officer, University of Utah
Debra Schaller-Demers, MSOM, Director, Research Outreach and Compliance, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Monday, March 19, 2018 - 2:15pm to 3:30pm

M301: How to Manage and Develop New Research Administrators

The purpose of this session is to give an overview of the process of developing new research administrators from the hiring process up to making them fully independent staff.  We will go into detail about the interview process (how to determine what is the right fit), what kind of background (experience) you should look for, how to get them started on the right foot once hired (30-60-90 day plans), having the proper support network for mentoring and training and setting their expectations and goals for Year 1.

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Determine the best qualities to look for when interviewing for a new Research Administrator.
  2. Implement training and mentoring plans for the development of new talent.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Allisson Dugan, Research Administrative Director, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

M302: Your Research Staff, Your Research Tools All Drive Your Research Outcomes

After identifying several academic department challenges including competing priorities, turnover, lack of training, HR issues, audit issues, and lack of development plans, JHU leadership formed a research work group to address these concerns. With the large size of our decentralized institution, we developed four subcommittees to concentrate on each category- HR, training, metrics, and recruitment.  The subcommittee with an immediate impact was the training committee with their formation of a Fundamentals of Sponsored Programs Boot Camp. We will discuss the development and lessons learned based on our experiences. 

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Leveraging existing internal resources to standardize the research administration workforce. 
  2. Identifying problems and Driving improvements for common grant management issues. 

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Alexander Galea, Associate Administrator, Johns Hopkins University
Matthew Zeback, Senior Grants and Contracts Analyst, Johns Hopkins University

M303: Close Out - Don't Shut Down

Define the keys to unlock a less stressful closeout. Simplify your award management process on the path to closeout completion. Discuss the process of closing out Federal awards at Institutions of Higher Education. Describe how the Office of the Management and Budget (OMB) Uniform Guidance can help to guide Institutions through the close-out process. Identify how the Uniform Guidance helps to determine what is allowable and allocable. Presenters will demonstrate the importance of communication and coordination with colleagues throughout the process to ensure a streamlined and efficient award close-out.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Utilize Federal regulations, Sponsor guidelines and Institutional policies to provide consistency in closing Federal awards.
  2. Create a consistent document or tool to complete a closeout.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Christine Toalepai, Sponsored Programs Administrator, University of Maryland, Baltimore
Libre McAdory, Program Administrator, University of Maryland, Baltimore

M304: Navigating the Minefield of a Research Misconduct Investigation

Recent studies suggest allegations of research misconduct are on the rise and, unfortunately, incidents of research misconduct may also be increasing.  In addressing research misconduct allegations, it is important there be careful adherence to all applicable regulations and policies to ensure a timely, fair and uncompromised investigation.  In this session, we will discuss the major steps involved in conducting a research misconduct investigation.  An emphasis on aspects that can be especially complicated or challenging will be discussed including the scope of review, sequestration of records, confidentiality, interviewing witnesses and respondent, protecting whistleblowers, voluntary settlement agreements, reporting to ORI, and handling outside inquiries.  The role and importance of RCR training as an integral part of the process during and following the investigation will be described.  

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Participants will better understand how the major steps in a research misconduct investigation are undertaken and successfully conducted.
  2. Participants will learn how research education and RCR training programs are useful resources and potential remedies throughout the research misconduct investigation process.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Craig Allison, JD, Director of Research Compliance, University of California at Davis
 

M305: Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Awards (NRSA)

This session will provide an overview of the Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Awards (NRSA) and discuss the recent changes. It will also provide clear instructions on how to complete the budget portion of an NRSA application. 

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify the types of NRSA support and the differences between them.
  2. Provide guidance to staff and potential recipients of NRSA awards.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Debbie Pettitt, Senior Grants Management Officer, National Institutes of Health

M306: Understanding Faculty Approaches to Clinical Research

The research environment continues to evolve from the early pioneering days of the individual researcher working away in the lab to the more collaborative and out-reaching world of today.  We are also beginning to take a broader look at how research contributes, not only to the clinical disciplines, but also to the patients and the communities we look to serve.  This presentation will offer a researcher’s perspective of the changing landscape of research as it migrates toward greater community engagement research.

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Enhance understanding of your researchers’ world. 
  2. Gain an appreciation of current research trends toward more community-engaged research.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Thomas Oates, PhD, DMD, Professor and Chair, University of Maryland, Baltimore, School of Dentistry

Monday, March 19, 2018 - 3:45pm to 5:00pm

M401: Human Resources Management and Best Practices for the Department Administrator

This session will cover all aspects of Human Resources Management for the Department Administrator. This session will explore all pre-employment processes and best practices for the Administrator to get highly qualified candidates into their workplace. This session will also cover various payroll and equity issues that the Department Administrator may encounter. This will be a very interactive session between the participants and presenters and use various "what is wrong with this case study scenarios" to get everyone discussing how Human Resources Management is practiced at various Universities/Institutes. The session will also cover hot topics such as grievance/conflict resolution, VISA/International worker issues, Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), performance evaluations, mentoring, Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), on-boarding and supervision styles/issues.

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Use best practices and case studies to assist the Department Administrator become a more effective manager.
  2. Understand Human Resource Management issues more clearly and how these issues are resolved by various Universities/Institutes.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

William F. Hoffman, Jr., MAS, Research Administrator, University of Maryland, Baltimore, School of Dentistry
Nancy Bowers, MBA, Director, Finance and Administration, University of Maryland, Baltimore, School of Pharmacy 

M402: Assessing a Team's Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats

Identifying the Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats (SWOT) of a team is essential to any successful business. Research Administrators (RAs) can apply the same method to begin a comprehensive assessment of their office or department. Many RAs face similar external threats with ever-changing funding landscapes and government regulations. However, capitalizing on strengths can help a team mitigate potential threats. Weaknesses often highlight areas for opportunities. A SWOT analysis can be a productive exercise to do with a team and serve as a catalyst for growth. The speakers will describe how a SWOT analysis can be an effective team engagement activity, share their experiences, walk through interactive exercises with the audience, and provide RAs with tools on how to conduct not only the analysis with their teams, but also how to act upon the results.

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Describe what a SWOT analysis is and the methods to effectively conduct a SWOT analysis.
  2. Develop a strategy to analyze a team's strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats specific to a research administration environment.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Jennifer E. Woodward, PhD, Vice Chancellor for Research Operations, University of Pittsburgh
Laura Kingsley, MPH, CRA, Senior Associate Director, University of Pittsburgh 

M403: Watering Down the F&A Rate Calculation

This lively session uses a pitcher of water and a little imagination to explain the complex calculation of the Facilities & Administrative Costs rates.  Understanding the rate calculation makes it clear to Research Administrators what costs can be charged directly to sponsored projects and what costs are already included in the F&A rate.  

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Basic understanding of the F&A rate calculation.
  2. Attendees will be able to explain to researchers what they are "paying for" with F&A. 

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Ann Holmes, Assistant Dean, Finance & Administration, University of Maryland, College Park
Patricia C. Holmes, Director of Finance, Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, University of Maryland, Baltimore

M404: Why Can't We Just Sign It?

This session will provide a detailed overview of material terms found in sponsored research contracts.  It will also explore how negotiation of these terms can substantially affect institutional risk, commercialization of intellectual property, and research outcomes. 

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify and understand the materials terms often found in sponsored research contracts.
  2. Develop a firm grasp of how negotiation of these materials terms can affect institutional risk and research outcomes.  

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Tom Burns, JD, Director, Johns Hopkins University

M405: Public Access Policy: Accelerating the Delivery of Tomorrow's Advancements

This session provides an overview of how grant-funded publications are managed to ensure an accurate and up-to-date list of publications (bibliography) that meets the National Institutes of Health (NIH) requirements for grant applications, progress reports, and public access. It also provides and overview of setting up My National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), My Bibliography, adding new publications, linking My NCBI account to an Electronic Research Administration (eRA) Commons account and grants. This will be a hands-on session. Please bring your laptop or electronic device to connect directly with My NCBI.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Understand what is My NCBI. Accessing, registering, creating, linking and managing publications.
  2. Understanding the four methods and what submission method to use.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Timothy Schailey, MS, Director, Research Administration, Thomas Jefferson University
Erin Bailey, Chief Financial Officer, CTSA, University at Buffalo

M406: Negotiating Clinical Trial Agreements with For-Profit Companies

Tips, traps and tricks of negotiating clinical trial agreements with the industry including a discussion of conducting negotiations via email versus teleconference discussions. I will present scenarios for discussion to illustrate tactics and strategies.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Analyze negotiation strategies, identify their individual strengths and weakness and list common mistakes made by negotiators on each side of the table.
  2. Describe the benefits of compromise and tools to help finding it.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Casi Morales, JD, Contract Manager, University of Utah

Tuesday, March 20, 2018 - 9:30am to 10:45am

CANCELLED: T104: International Case Studies in Research Misconduct

An updated review of new and historic cases involving accusations of research misconduct in biology, chemistry, physics and medicine provide some insightful examples of both responsibly and irresponsibly conducted science. Research integrity is of paramount importance to our institutions and noncompliance with modern RCR standards can result in severe penalties to the organization, the individual(s), and their reputations. But the modern definition of research misconduct is relatively new, having evolved from hundreds of years of social and ethical issues that have arisen in the practice of scientific research. So what may have been acceptable practice a century ago may be considered unacceptable practice by today’s standards. In this highly interactive session, participants will become familiar with an international case history of research misconduct and will engage in discussion of how these prominent cases have shaped contemporary perspectives on the responsible conduct of research. NOTE:  Highly interactive session using wireless audience response system to engage participants, evaluate feedback and formulate group consensus on a variety of ethical issues and questions.

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Describe a variety of famous cases involving ethical issues in research and apply modern RCR standards to better assess and work through those issues.
  2. Discuss the relevant rules and regulations of modern RCR standards and the ethical principles and cases that justify current institutional compliance policies.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Tony Onofrietti, MS, CRSS, Director, Research Education, University of Utah

LC1: Motivation: New Leaders in Research Administration

Becoming a leader in research administration can be a direct or an indirect choice. Regardless of the path leading you to your new leadership role, sustaining motivation is critical to being a successful and an effective leader. As a new leader, we are now expected to take our leadership skills to the next level. In addition to our research administration skills, we are required to cultivate our leadership skills by having increased awareness, understanding the challenges in leadership, having the ability to manage conflict, and knowing when to delegate. In this session, participants will learn how to develop strategies to maintain motivation in their new leadership role.

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify ways to stay motivated by setting, at least five (5), annual professional and personal goals. 
  2. Understand the significance of accomplishing each goals and their importance to maintaining motivation.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Shuna Holmes, MPA, Institutional Research Administrator, Soka University of America

T101: Effective Leadership Skills for Research Administrators and Clinical Supervisors

Today's leadership landscape is dynamic with an unpredictable plethora of regulations and budgetary restrictions. Research Administrators and Clinical Supervisors, namely those in administrative and management roles, need a wide range of operational, relational, and analytical skills to effectively carry out their responsibilities. This session will provide information on being effective leaders, doing their jobs well and identifying how leadership skills can directly affect the quality of the performance of staff.

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Define the traits of effective leadership; How to approach leadership proactively.
  2. Describe methods of assessing various leadership styles; How to effectively apply leadership principles as a research administrator and/or clinical supervisor.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Timothy Schailey, MS, Director, Research Administration, Thomas Jefferson University
Erin Bailey, Chief Financial Officer, CTSA, University at Buffalo
Brian Squilla, MBA, Vice President of Administration & Chief of Staff, Provost's Office, Thomas Jefferson University

T102: Common Negotiation Issues in Sponsored Research Agreements

Our presentation will touch on a number of issues administrators encounter when reviewing and negotiating sponsored awards. Depending on the specifics of the project, certain regulations and requirements can have a huge impact on an organization's ability to comply with the terms of an agreement, and their ability to pursue the researchers’ objectives. We will address a wide range of topics including grants, subawards, data use agreements, and specific concerns such as intellectual property, indemnification, confidentiality, and international collaborations, among others.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Recognize different considerations involved in the review of research agreements, as well as non-funded agreements.
  2. Develop specific requirements, and more general terms and conditions, based on the purpose of the research project.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Rachel Talentino, JD, Grants & Contracts Officer, Harvard University
Carolina Harvey, Grants & Contracts Officer, Harvard University
Melissa Maher, Manager, Subawards, Harvard University

T103: Let's Start Spending! Tools and Techniques to Improve Award Processing from End-to-End

Prompt award setup, from receipt through the final setup of the award in an institution’s system is one of the most critical and complex processes in research administration.  Numerous offices must work together to ensure key information is communicated effectively, accurately and timely. Principal investigators want visibility into the timeline to when they can spend, while pre- and post-award managers in central offices need metrics to monitor award setup times, identify bottlenecks, and streamline processes. When pre- and post-award offices employ an end-to-end solution to award setup, the institution, the PI and the public benefit.  This session will discuss:  1. Why the award setup process is such a critical and complex process for sponsored programs offices; 2. The methods three universities are using to educate faculty about realistic award setup times and provide visibility into the timeline for award setups; 3. Examples of metrics used by management to monitor setup times and identify issues that delay and/or inhibit setup time;  4.  Tools used by award negotiators to ensure terms and conditions are acceptable and to expedite approvals of agreements, contracts, and other award documents; and  5. Processes used at the pre-award stage to ensure smooth transition of a proposal application to award set–up (budgeting, compliance, cost-sharing, subrecipient data, etc.) 

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify tools to improve award processing.
  2. Describe the benefits in using metrics to evaluate award processing.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Kimberly Page, Manager, Pre-Award Services, Boise State University
Pamela F. Miller, PhD, Interim Executive Director, Sponsored Projects Office, University of California at Berkeley
Dara Little, MPA, CRA, Assistant Vice President for Research, Northern Illinois University
Jennie Amison, Director, Sponsored Research Development, San Diego State University Research Foundation
 

T105: Research Support Models to Strengthen and Enhance Your Organization

Effective research support models are critical to the success of both investigators and the entities in which they carry out their research.  The challenge for many institutions and investigators is the ability to find and retain professional, qualified staff that understand the unique aspects of sponsored research while providing top tier customer service.  Opportunities for improved service models for investigators are often discouraged by institutional culture, politics or inflexible organizational mentalities, but most often opportunities are not pursued because people are just not encouraged to think ‘outside the box’.

This session will provide examples of different approaches to service models that have been implemented at Partners Healthcare, including integrated department and central positions, temporary hourly staffing and cohort training.  These models have benefited the investigators and the institutions by providing a higher level of quality service, professional development opportunities to employees, and improved compliance. The session will also provide transparency into the impetus for these models and key factors to consider in order to successfully implement them at your organization.
 

Content level: Advanced

Learning objectives:

  1. Understand how to initiate similar models at your organization.
  2. Understand how these models can strengthen organizations engaged in sponsored research, meet the needs of investigators and offer professional development opportunities to staff. 

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Andrew Chase, Vice President, Research Management and Research Finance, Partners HealthCare
Eleni Ryals, Corporate Director, Research Management/Research Support Services, Partners HealthCare

T106: Clinical Trials: What Industry Expects from Research Sites

Drug development and the pharmaceutical industry sometimes feels like a black box to those of us in research administration.  We will discuss the timelines of drug development and what drives industry concerns for conduct of clinical trials.  The basics of protocol development and the organizational structure of industry will be presented.  Research infrastructure that is important to a pharmaceutical company will be outlined in a way that sites can be prepared for a site initiation visit and be more successful in obtaining contracts and implementing projects.  

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Understand the drug development process including pharmaceutical industry drivers.
  2. Understand how a research site is selected and basic contract negotiation topics for clinical trials.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Tonya Edvalson, CCRP, CHRC, Clinical Research Compliance Officer, University of Utah

Tuesday, March 20, 2018 - 11:00am to 12:15pm

LC3: The Juggle: How to Stay Organized and Set Priorities

Staying organized is difficult. But what's worse? How about when you have what seems like an infinite amount of work responsibilities and have no idea how to get organized in the first place. During this session, we will explore the different types of work responsibilities that generally take place, how you can better organize your individual tasks, and discuss both the successes and limitations of organizational strategies.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify where the organizational "hazards" are coming from.
  2. Identify a plan to implement in your own day-to-day to be better organized moving forward.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Meaghan Lancaster, CPRA, Proposal Specialist, Georgetown University Medical Center
Maria Manalac, Sub-Award Administrator, Georgetown University 

T201: Tips and Tricks: Time Management in a Bottle

You are working on a budget, taking a phone call to talk to a PI about why a cost transfer needs to be done and answering your colleague’s question about a PI who wants to assign a research tech’s time and effort to his grant that has been closed for three months and the time and effort took place in year 4 of a 5 year grant. Managing one work project is difficult enough, but when other projects start piling up, it's not easy to stay on top of them all and keep up with everyday work. How do Research Administrators do it?  In this session, we will: 1. Looking at the ability to actually conduct multiple tasks at the same time is worthy of discussion.   How do we make multi-tasking an efficient management technique? 2. Discuss ways to manage interacting with faculty who have various deadlines, returning to school for another degree, and balancing family life. 3.  What can we do on a daily basis to stay on track and identify what is important when everything is a high priority? 4. How can we stay motivated and minimize stress when the pressure is on?

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Provide strategies gained to help them manage additional task from faculty and staff.
  2. Identify priorities and create a to-do list that works for you and identify the tips you want to implement.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Paulette Jones, MRE, BA, Administrator, University of Montana

T202: Team Science and Collaborative Grants

As modern research methods have become more specialized and the true complexity of today’s most pressing health issues and diseases is revealed, collaborations among scientists trained in different fields have become essential for exploring and tackling these problems. This specialization of research methods has made interdependence, joint ownership, and collective responsibility between and among scientists near requirements. Most researchers will find themselves asked to participate on or lead a research team at some point in their careers. As the focus on research teams sharpens, questions are emerging about what constitutes a successful team and how research teams can maximize their effectiveness and experiences. Not every team is successful—some are able to achieve only some of their goals, or fail and dissolve. Other teams are highly successful—reaching and often exceeding their recognized goals and creating positive experiences for team members and the institutions that support them. Why is this the case? What constitutes a successful research team? Why do some research teams succeed while others do not? What factors maximize a research team’s productivity or effectiveness? How can research teams be best recognized, evaluated, and rewarded?  This session will explore all of these issues and offer strategies for research administrators to work effectively in this collaborative environment. 

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Describe strategies for working effectively with collaborative research teams.
  2. Apply these strategies to developing complex collaborative grant applications.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Marjorie Piechowski, PhD, Emerita Director of Research Support, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

T204: Issues in Cannabis Research

Are your researchers pestering you with questions about cannabis research?  As of October 2017, 29 states and the District of Columbia had laws legalizing marijuana for medical and/or recreational use.  This groundswell of legalization has resulted in increasing interest and funding for cannabis-related research.  At the same time, marijuana continues to be a Schedule 1 drug under Federal Law, complicating the legal and regulatory landscape related to cannabis research.  This session will help you answer those questions by providing an overview of the regulatory framework, and a discussion of the impact on research, including funding, and more. 

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Understand the risks associated with cannabis research.
  2. Identify strategies to manage that risk.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Jill Williamson, JD, Partner, CKR Law
Eric Ritvo, JD, Managing Director, TEQ Analytical Laboratories

T205: National Science Foundation (NSF) Update

This session will cover new developments at the National Science Foundation (NSF) - programs, policies, people and budgets. Senior NSF staff will provide a comprehensive review of what is new and developing at NSF.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Understand how NSF has implemented recent changes to proposal and award policies and procedures.
  2. Learn about new changes to NSF systems including proposal submission modernization and changes to user account management.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Jeremy A. Leffler, Outreach Specialist, Policy Office, Division of Institution & Award Support, Office of Budget, Finance & Award Management, National Science Foundation 

T206: Keeping Up with ClinicalTrials.gov

It is scientifically and ethically imperative for researchers to understand key commitments to our research participants to report the results of the clinical trials, so that we can advance knowledge and make informed medical decisions about health care. This session will discuss the most recent federal mandates and requirements of clinical trials disclosure and the best practice. The presenters will share the approach of Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, to establish an effective program for clinical trials registration and results reporting at their institution. Rutgers’ Human Subjects Protection Program (HSPP) has taken a proactive approach to identify key issues and facilitate investigator compliance within ClinicalTrials.gov records through the HSPP website and continued education and training.  

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Understand why clinical trials disclosure matters and the key issues of building up an effective program.
  2. Understand how to establish a system in your organization to facilitate and monitor clinical trials registration and results reporting.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Cheryl Forst, RN, BSN, CCRP, Director, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
Niem-Tzu "Rebecca" Chen, MS, Med, CCRP, Human Subjects Protection Senior Analyst, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
 

Tuesday, March 20, 2018 - 2:15pm to 3:30pm

CANCELLED: T301: Delivering Personalized Training through Micro-Credentialing

Micro-credentialing is an innovative training process where participants earn ‘minicertifications’ in specific topic areas and gain recognition for skills they develop throughout their careers. Instruction is individualized by combining and reconfiguring specific topics based on one’s demonstrated competencies. Implementing technology-enhanced teaching approaches provide an integrated, agile and personalized learning experience resulting in improved job performance. This presentation will describe the basic requirements for high impact micro-credentialing, explain how to design effective assessment tools, and discuss best practices for practical skill development in the field of research administration. NOTE:  A practical case study of the implementation of micro-credentialing at The University of Utah for new requirements in Lab Safety training will be presented. An interactive audience response system will be provided to further engage attendees and discuss practical experiences and examples.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Describe how micro-credentialing is used to provide a personalized and effective training experience for research administrators to improve job competencies.
  2. Discuss different technologies and assessment tools useful in delivering and measuring skill development in integrated research administration training programs.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Tony Onofrietti, MS, CRSS, Director, Research Education, The University of Utah

LC6: Who's Who and What They Do at the National Institutes of Health (NIH)

With this presentation, we hope to take away some of the mystery you encounter when contacting the National Institutes of Health (NIH) with questions about your grants. The NIH is composed of myriad offices, institutes and centers, each with its own specific responsibilities and functions. Finding the right NIH office or staff person to contact with your grant issue can sometimes be daunting to the uninitiated. When do you call the eRA Helpdesk? What is OFM? Should I talk to the Program Officer or the Grants Management Specialist? All will be revealed! At the conclusion of this presentation, you will have a basic understanding of who does what at the NIH and how all these offices work together.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify major components of the NIH and locate the appropriate NIH office to address grant inquiries.
  2. Locate grants policy resources and important staff contact information.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Debbie Pettitt, Senior Grants Management Officer, National Institutes of Health

NEW: T308: Henrietta Lacks – Let’s Discuss the Ethics and Regulations of Then and Now

HeLa cells are paramount to many of being alive today and most of don’t even realize it.  However, these were cells from a living, breathing, and vivacious women who was a sister, mother, and wife.  At the same time, researchers in the 1950s were urgently seeking the cure for cervical cancer.  The collection of human tissues was not covered by any research regulation at the time.  Now that we have research regulations and a strong ethical framework that guides are research practices, it challenges the actions of the time when cells were collected and used from Henrietta Lacks to make groundbreaking medical cures.  While companies have profited and society has had the opportunity to see cures from otherwise deadly disease or live healthier lives, Henrietta’s family continued to lack education and access to that same medical care in some cases.  From the foundation of the book The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, we will discuss this dilemma, knowing what we know now versus what was happening then.  Come prepared to participate in a lively discussion that will challenge what you may have already believed, learn something new, but, more importantly, come away with more resolve to protect the participants and their information or tissues that we collect for research.  

*This session is replacing T104 for the IRAM-III requirement. 

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Describe the differences between research during the 1950s and now.
  2. Identify some of the medical breakthroughs possible because of HeLa cells.
  3. Discuss ethical dilemmas of tissue research.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Tonya Edvalson, CCRP, CHRC, Clinical Research Compliance Officer, University of Utah

T302: Anatomy of Policy Implementation

We would all like to think that with all the talk of reform at the Federal level, that we should be looking forward to fewer regulations and unfunded mandates but the reality is, that is probably just wishful thinking.  Institutions must interpret new regulatory mandates, develop policy and procedures, and identify the roles and responsibilities for compliance.  These are sometimes daunting charges.  This session will provide an overview of the process using a case study implementation to illustrate the steps that should be taken to effectively meet the regulatory compliance requirement.   

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify the parties who may have a role in meeting compliance requirements and designate roles and responsibilities for compliance.
  2. Conduct a fit/gap analysis to identify data or system needs to facilitate an efficient process.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Susan Wyatt Sedwick, PhD, CRA, Senior Consultant, Attain, LLC
 

T303: Faculty Transfers, Hello & Goodbye

Faculty come into our University and leave our University regularly. This presentation will focus on the many responsibilities and duties that face the Department Administrator to achieve a successful faculty transfer, with input from the Central Administration office. This session will provide a checklist of specific duties and "best practices" that must be accomplished to ensure a seamless transition. The presentation will also provide actual case studies and real-life scenarios so that the participants and presenters can dialogue on these "what would you do now" or "how would you handle this" cases/situations.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Better understand what is needed and what he/she needs to do when faculty are transferring into their University.
  2. Learn what to do when their faculty are leaving their University or transferring within their University to another department or school.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Janet Simons, MBA, Director of Research Policy, University of Maryland, Baltimore 
William F. Hoffman, Jr., MAS, Research Administrator, University of Maryland, Baltimore, School of Dentistry
Karen R. Sack, BS, Department Administrator, University of Maryland, Baltimore, School of Medicine Physical Therapy & Rehabilitation Science
 

T304: Procurement and the Uniform Guidance (2 CFR 200)

The procurement requirements and challenges represented by the Uniform Guidance addressed.  Discussion will involve the varying approaches institutions have taken toward ensuring institutional compliance.

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Develop an understanding of the Uniform Guidance’s procurement requirements; be able to discuss requirements with organizational leadership.
  2. Evaluate and implement compliant procurement systems.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Kris Rhodes, Director, Higher Education Practice, MAXIMUS

T305: Contributing to NIH and the National Effort to Cure Alzheimer's Disease

Since 2000, deaths from heart disease have decreased by 14%, while deaths from Alzheimer’s Disease have increased by 89% (alz.org).  In 2016, caregivers provided an estimated 18.2 Billion hours, valued at over $230 Billion, providing care to people living with Alzheimer’s Disease (alz.org).  Due to the rapid increase of people living with the disease, the nation has made the goal of curing Alzheimer’s Disease by 2025.  To achieve this goal, many areas of science that were previously unrecognized or underutilized will be vital in contributing to the mission of NIH.  NIH is working to partner with institutions and organizations from a broad spectrum of science and technology, to make significant impacts and advancements toward this objective.  This presentation will focus on the current and future global impacts of the disease, as well as how your institution or organization can contribute. 

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Give insight to how the National Institutes of Health(NIH) is working to partner with institutions and organizations from a broad spectrum of science and technology, to make significant impacts and advancements toward curing Alzheimer’s Disease. 
  2. Inform the science and technology communities of the opportunities regarding Alzheimer’s Disease research within the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Patrick Shirdon, MS, BA, Director of Management, National Institute on Aging (NIA)

T306: Should There Be a Policy?

This presentation will address how standard operating procedures can help or impede work processes for clinical trials.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify when policies need to be in place.
  2. Identify and introduce best practices.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Gayle Walters, MS. Director, Johns Hopkins University

T307: The Auditors are Coming... Are You Ready?

As a recipient of Federal funds as the prime institution or as a sub, an audit will be in your future. This session will focus on the potential reasons for an audit and the importance of effectively managing them. We will explore various types of audits and share practical tips on how to prepare and handle the process with positive outcomes. In addition, we will provide participants with common issues across auditing agencies and discuss common financial non-compliance issues for which auditors are searching. 

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify the various types of audits and understand the roles and responsibilities related to audits.
  2. Gain an overview of regulations that govern audits and insight into what auditors are looking for. 

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Marchon Jackson, Director of Sponsored Program Accounting and Compliance, Division of Research, University of Maryland, College Park 
Debra Murray, Assistant Director Compliance, University of Maryland, College Park
 

Tuesday, March 20, 2018 - 3:45pm to 5:00pm

T401: Career Pivot Points: Strategies and Pitfalls

Research administration is a growing and nimble profession that offers a wide array of career paths and pivot points.  This session will describe some of the pivot points in a career path and offer strategies to avoid common pitfalls.  Included in the session will be both experienced and entry-level panelists.  

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify pivot points in research administration careers and map a career strategy for these decisions.
  2. Use a wide array of resources to advance research administration careers.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Marjorie Piechowski, PhD, Emerita Director of Research Support, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Dominic Esposito, CRA, Director, Corporate, Foundation and Government Relations, College of New Rochelle 

T402: Perspectives of Central vs. Departmental Research Offices

The presenters will discuss their experiences regarding the differences between department and central research administration. The session will cover each unit's concerns, regarding allowability, allocation, consistency, and compliance. Additionally, the session will highlight differences between major research institutions and lessor research institutions, including PUIs.

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Differentiate the perspectives of central vs departmental research administration.
  2. Integrate the "other's" rationales into your work processes.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Rene Hearns, MPA, CRA, Assistant Director/Study Coordinator/Budget Analyst, US Department of Veterans Affairs Cleveland Medical Center
Kate McCormick, CRA, Senior Grant Administrator, Suffolk University

T403: Indirect Costs Rates: A Non-Profit Perspective

Almost every research institution must engage in the process of negotiating federal indirect rates. Non-profits face unique challenges in preparing, submitting and negotiating indirect rates. As we go through this process, many of us often wonder if we’ve done everything we can do within the constraints of federal regulations in order to maximize our institution’s negotiated indirect rate and resulting indirect cost recovery. In this session, we will discuss strategies that may be employed to maximize indirect cost recovery, both in the preparation of your indirect rate proposal as well as during the subsequent rate negotiation and budgeting of indirect costs on grants and contracts. Participants will be encouraged to share their experiences concerning the indirect rate process.  We will also discuss the impact that the new Uniform Guidance will have on preparing and negotiating indirect rates and what participants are doing to prepare for these changes.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify what an indirect cost rate is, its importance and the various types of costs recovered through the indirect rate.
  2. Explore different types of rates and how they impact recovery and understand the process for preparing, submitting and negotiating the rate under the Uniform Guidance.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Alex Weekes, CPA, Principal, ML Weekes & Company, PC

T404: An Administrator's Pre- and Post-award Review of the Central Office Award Package

A critical stage in the life cycle of an award is when the DRA receives the central office internal award package. This package includes critical terms and conditions for compliance by the PI. This session will focus on the discussion of this critical initial stage of the award where the DRA’s understanding of these terms is key to the smooth success of the award process for both the central office and the PI.  

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Develop an understanding of some troublesome terms that may impact a DRA effective administration of the grant or contract project.
  2. Learn best practices when reviewing the central office internal award package and spot potential problems for the DRA, PI and the institution may face and need to tackle. 

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Geraldine Pierre, JD, Grants and Contracts Manager, Boston University School of Public Health

T405: National Institutes of Health (NIH) Update

Don’t miss this opportunity to hear about what is new and being developed within the National Institute of Health's (NIH) programs, policies, and budgets.  In this comprehensive review participants will learn about the newest policy updates and how their respective institutions may be impacted. Upon completion of the presentation, participants will have the opportunity to ask questions about new and existing policies and procedures.  Topics include recent and upcoming changes to NIH policy, compliance requirements, and so much more!

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Participants will learn about NIH's budget priorities.
  2. Participants will learn about new policies and compliance initiatives.
  3. Participants will gain insight into current issues at NIH.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Pam Fleming, Chief, Grants Management Office, National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institutes of Health 

T406: Capitated Budgets: Post-Award Financial Management of Clinical Trial Contracts

How does managing a fixed-price clinical trial contract differ from a cost reimbursable grant? Even for financial administrators experienced in post-award grant management, capitated budgets may present a challenge. Fixed-price contracts may require a shift in one's perception of and established standards for effort allocation, project periods, budgetary line items, billing procedures, and reconciliation processes. The concepts of flexible budgets, amendable budgets, milestone reimbursements, negotiations with sponsors, flat fees, competitive enrollment, charges vs. costs become a new reality. Recent years show that even National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding is gradually shifting to capitated reimbursement structure for clinical research proposals. In this session participants will utilize sample clinical trial contracts and financial tools to address the differences between fixed-price and cost-reimbursable projects as well as the post-award challenges and the benefits of capitated contracts.

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Define main differences in post-award management of fixed-price contracts and cost-reimbursable grants.
  2. Utilize practical skills in post-award financial management of capitated clinical trial contracts.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Vanessa Bryant, Manager, Budget & Finance, University of Utah 

T407: Using Research Performance and Productivity Data to Maximize Research Proposal Competitiveness

In many disciplines the need to successfully compete for external research funding has never been greater and never so challenging. Numerous high quality proposals are often submitted to the same funding source. The percentage of proposals being funded may reach to the single digit level. Small differences in these proposals can be the difference between success and failure. Among these is the objective and data-driven analysis of the research topic, detailed analysis of the individual and collective capabilities of the research team, and more recently the data management and sharing plans. Increasingly, though the appointment and assistance of proposal development and support teams that have the ability to provide this data and analysis to the researchers the odds of success can be significantly increased. 

Content level: Advanced

Learning objectives:

  1.  To have the ability to recognize the potential and develop strategies that can significantly increase the odds that research proposals will be funded.
  2.  How to find and assemble data, under take the necessary analysis, and construct graphics that gives research proposals a competitive advantage for funding.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Brad Fenwick, PhD, DVM, Senior Vice President, Elsevier

Wednesday, March 21, 2018 - 8:30am to 9:00am

R1: Above and Beyond Doing It All

If your office is also responsible for the Institutional Review Board (IRB), undergraduate research program, or other affiliated areas on your campus, this session is for you!  Strategies for successful coordination will be shared that address the one-person shop charged with additional duties beyond "pure" grants administration.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Share your successes and challenges with office "extras" with other members in a supportive environment.
  2. Analyze strategies to more effectively coordinate all of the areas of responsibility in their offices.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Bonnie Troupe, Director of Academic Development, Stonehill College

R2: Working Together: The Art of Communication, Collaboration and Expectation Setting

The purpose of this session is to have an open discussion regarding the work environment and how to best communicate and collaborate with PIs, co-workers, leadership, and subordinates. As every organization is different regarding policy and operating procedures, we will focus on individual contributors and how to make the most out of an individual's role to drive success. This will be an active-engagement style session as it will be important to hear from both the issues and successes participants have in their organization as it relates to communication.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify at least 3 areas of improvement relating to their own communication practices and/or their organization's current communication practices.
  2. Create a plan to implement to better their current communication approach with others.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Meaghan Lancaster, CPRA, Proposal Specialist, Georgetown University Medical Center
Maria Manalac, Sub-Award Administrator, Georgetown University
 

R3: Leading Up and Sideways: Finding Your Way through Frustration to Collaboration

This discussion group will share tips and tricks about how to collaborate even when you are super frustrated.  The group will share real-world experiences and funny stories that keep you laughing and not crying.  Don't be shy....we don't force everyone to talk....come learn from your peers even want to learn more than share.  

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Have ways to work through frustration.
  2. Collaborate in not perfect situations.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Alex Manning, Account Executive, Cayuse

R4: Policies & Procedures Requirements for Improving Administrative Infrastructure

We all know we need written policies and procedures for operational efficiency and compliance and that by having policies and procedures in writing we improve our operations and our internal control environment, but sometimes trying to decide where to focus our time is a challenge.  In this session we will discussion the pre/post award and other institutional policies and/or procedures that we are required to have in place for responsible grant and contract management.  We will also discuss the need for policies and procedures which may not be mandated by federal sponsors, but which should be in place to improve our service orientation, constituent adoption, and improving internal control environment.  We will also discuss best practices for writing policies and procedures and how there really is no one solution to what should be policy and what should be a procedure.  

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify the policies which are required by 2 CFR 200.
  2. Assist the attendee's organization in addressing policy and procedure gaps which may exist.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Kris Rhodes, Director, Higher Education Practice, MAXIMUS

R5: Grants and Contracts Acronyms and Terminology for the Research Administrator

There are lots of terms and acronyms used to refer to roles and aspects in the grants and contracts lifecycle. This session will explore our diverse worlds of acronyms and discuss a glossary of internal and external grants and contracts terminology.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Discuss common federal and non-federal sponsor jargon and terms. 
  2. Become familiar with new sponsor acronyms and terms.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Geraldine Pierre, JD, Grants and Contracts Manager, Boston University School of Public Health

R6: Pacific Northwest Chapter

Join your Chapter colleagues for a casual conversation and Q&A to connect and talk about what’s happening in your local area. 

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. A question & answer session with an SRAI Chapter Officer. 
  2. Learn more about what is happening in the local area. 

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Cindy Shirley, President, Pacific Northwest Chapter, SRA International 

R7: Becoming More Involved in Society of Research Administrators International (SRAI)

This Roundtable discussion will be led by Bill Hoffman (Northeast Immediate Past President). An experienced SRA International Section Officer and Committee Member will share his experience on how and why he became more involved with SRA International. He will discuss the benefits of being more active in SRA International and describe the networking connections that he has made. If you are interested in becoming more involved in your Society, either at a Chapter, Section, or SRA International Committee level, please stop by, meet some officers and learn more.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. A question & answer session with an SRAI Section Officer.
  2. To get more attendees involved in SRAI Committees and Volunteering Opportunities.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

William Hoffman, Immediate Past President, Northeast Section, SRA International

R8: Northern California Chapter

Join your Chapter colleagues for a casual conversation and Q&A to connect and talk about what’s happening in your local area. 

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. A question & answer session with an SRAI Chapter Officer. 
  2. Learn more about what is happening in the local area. 

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Donald Campbell, CRA, Director, Office of Contracts and Grants, University of San Francisco

Wednesday, March 21, 2018 - 9:15am to 10:30am

W101: The Virtuosity of Delegation, Whose Task Is It?

Have you ever caught yourself saying one of the following when considering delegating a task? It will be faster if I do it myself. I’m not sure this will get done correctly if I don’t do it myself. I really like doing this, so I’ll do it myself. I don't like to ask. If so, this workshop is for you. Participants will learn more about why, what, when and to whom to delegate.  This session is intended for managers and supervisors.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. We will identify reasons why delegation is essential for managers/supervisors of high performing teams.
  2. Discovering key aspects of successful delegation.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Sheila McMillan, Administrative Office Manager, Drexel University Dornsife School of Public Health

W102: Winning the Marathon: Effective Award Management from Start to Finish

Much like preparing to run a marathon, effective award management is a labor intensive process that requires acute attention to detail. Without the right tools and knowledge, it can be a grueling process that can seem overwhelming and unmanageable. To ensure attendees have a positive and confident perspective of award management throughout the process, we have identified five key components.  Our workshop focuses on how to successfully “run” an award by: possessing a clear interpretation of the sponsor’s intentions in the budget narrative; preparing reconciliations; utilizing pivot tables; analyzing the importance of one on one meetings; and formulating more accurate budget forecasts.  Each of these tools are necessary to better prepare participants to successfully complete the marathon, conquering the “race” from start to finish.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Have the tools to successfully manage an award from start to finish.
  2. Possess the tools to effectively articulate the financial components of the award management process with stakeholders. 

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Rachel Hayes, Business Operations Manager, Arizona State University 
Daysi Ardon, Business Operations Specialist, Arizona State University 
Zachary Wicklund, Fiscal Specialist, Arizona State University 
 

W103: We're Not in Kansas Anymore: Adapting to Other Sides of the Rainbow

Research Administrators often change jobs from one university to another, or even one department to another.  The rules of Research Administration may be the same, but how does one successfully navigate the differing cultures, faculty and administrative expectations, as well as resources (or lack of)?  Add the dimension of size and Carnegie Classification to the mix and it’s an entirely different (and sometimes unrecognizable) ballgame.  This session is a study of three journeys, and the perspectives, expectations, challenges, and lessons learned when going from a state flagship Research Intensive University (R1) to a regional comprehensive Primarily Undergraduate Institution (PUI), from an R1 to a small research institution, and from a PUI to a PUI with a new supervisor with R1 experience.   And if that isn’t enough, we’ll add implementing a new Electronic Research Administration tool to our list of changes and challenges.  Hang on -- the weather could get rough!

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Recognize challenges that come with change and identify effective solutions.
  2. Reflect on lessons learned from others and translate them for use in their own circumstance.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Teri Herberger, MSM, CRA, Director of Sponsored Programs, Salisbury University
Angela Richmond, Director, Office of Research Administration and Advancement, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science
Beth Walsh, Grants Specialist, Salisbury University

W104: Managing Institutional vs. Departmental Cores

Core facilities are centralized fee-for-service facilities that provide goods and services to the research community, both internal and external. At Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, we have four different core designations.  Most cores share similar characteristics but are also different in the way they are managed.  This presentation will explain the differences and offer tips on how to properly manage the different types of cores from a research administration standpoint.  This includes, designating which type of core, how to assist a PI on preparing a business plan and budget and managing the budget, invoicing and cash flow once a core is established.  We will also touch on federal and potential institutional regulations regarding setting up and operating cores.

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Create and maintain a budget for a new core.
  2. Explain the differences between institutional and departmental cores.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Allisson Dugan, Research Administrative Director, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Tanya Santos, Manager, Research Operations, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

W105: When is Prior Approval Required

This presentation covers post-award changes that require prior approval and which post-award changes the recipient has the latitude to make without prior approval.  We will discuss how failure to obtain the required prior approval from the appropriate awarding IC may result in the disallowance of costs, termination of the award, or other enforcement action within NIH's authority.

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Understand the prior approval process.
  2. Determine which post-award changes do or do not require prior approval.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Debbie Pettitt, Senior Grants Management Officer, National Institutes of Health

W106: Financial Feasibility Assessment Tools

Many factors determine the financial and logistical feasibility of clinical research studies. This session provides an overview of standard operating procedure and tools necessary to make this determination, developed from study examples and case studies. Tips on reviewing initial documents such as the proposed contract, sponsor budget, protocol and schedule of events and informed consent in the development of accurate internal cost assessments and cost-benefit analysis will be demonstrated. Vetting and ranking of study trials will be discussed.

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Review the factors impacting financial feasibility of a clinical research. 
  2. Manage the development of internal cost assessments and cost-benefit analysis.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Renee Vaughan, Mdiv, MA, CRA, CRU Financial Practice Manager, Duke University School of Medicine

Wednesday, March 21, 2018 - 10:45am to 12:00pm

W201: Self-efficacy: Emerging Leaders in Research Administration

To meet the need of the complexity and ever-changing requirements of research, institutions are seeking qualified research administrators with extensive knowledge. As research administration professionals, understanding your current level of self-efficacy is an important factor in pursuing leadership roles. During this session, we will discuss and elaborate on what motivates us to pursue leadership roles in research administration and what makes us stand out from others. 

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Assess their work and educational experiences, skills, capabilities, and mastery experience as it relates to career development. 
  2. Identify professional barriers and personal obstacles in pursing and obtaining leadership roles.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Shuna Holmes, MPA, Institutional Research Administrator, Soka University of America

W202: Metrics that Matter: Assessing Workflow and Staffing

This session will demonstrate how the Pediatric Ontario (Oncology) Protocol Assessment Level (Peds-OPAL) can be adapted as a mechanism for measuring complexity beyond its incipient use for measuring study complexity associated with research coordinator workload.  This session will provide insights on how assigning complexity scoring can assist is balancing workload, assessing reasonable workloads and justifying new staffing associated with new research foci and strategic goals to increase research funding.   Using complexity ratings can help managers more accurately balance workload and assign proposals and awards.   Complexity scoring can provide valuable metrics for making the case for additional staffing in response or in anticipation of growth in research but to also make the case for increasing salaries to help in retention of experienced staff.  Note:  This topic could be effective in a 75 minutes discussion setting.

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Develop a ratings matrix for proposals, awards and clinical studies applicable to their institution.
  2. Understand how to use workflow matrix to justify additional positions and increase salaries to retain experience staff.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Susan Wyatt Sedwick, PhD, CRA, Senior Consultant, Attain, LLC
Michele Vaughan, BS, CCRP, Director, Clinical Research Operations for Hem/Onc/BMT Director, NEXT Consortium, Nationwide Children's Hospital 

W203: Understanding the Term "Source Documentation"

The world of research administration is constantly evolving and technology plays an important role in that evolution.  The fairly recent audit approach called, "Data Analytics", requires we take a deeper dive at our internal policies, procedures, processes and systems of record to establish what is adequate "source documentation" for the various transaction we review and approve.  Has this new approach modified the view of the "allowability criteria" and it means to have appropriate documentation on hand?  Where have we come and where are we headed?  This session will look at the transactional level detail and philosophical approaches to meeting the reasonableness, allowability and allocability tests. 

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Critique various methods of source documentation.
  2. Differentiate between "soft" and "hard" source documentation.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Denise Clark, Associate Vice President for Administration, University of Maryland, College Park
Ann Holmes, Assistant Dean, College of Behavior and Social Sciences, University of Maryland, College Park  
Dennis Paffrath, MBA, CRA, Assistant Vice President, Research, University of Maryland, Baltimore

W204: Data Management Tools for Research Administrators

As financial systems become more sophisticated and reporting requirements escalate, it becomes increasingly important for departmental research administrators to understand data and how to use it. This session will cover the basics of data management using tools within MS Excel, without having to do custom programming or needing an advanced degree in computer science. The session is geared toward a user with basic Excel knowledge and is intended to teach participants some tools to enable them to build dynamic reports for both internal and external customers. 

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Understand basic elements of a data table and database.
  2. Learn how to build lookup tables and use formulas to better categorize and summarize your data. Learn how to make your data work for you by building and modifying pivot tables. Walk away with some handy Excel tips and tricks.

Prerequisites: Basic working knowledge of MS Excel. Please bring a computer with MS Excel to the session.

Speaker(s):

Gaye Bugenhagen, Director of Administrative Services, University of Maryland, College Park
Rebecca Hunsaker, Director of Research Administration, University of Maryland, College Park 

W205: Think. Act. Lead.: A Case Study for Institutional Collaboration

In 2015, the Davis Educational Foundation awarded a grant to Stonehill College for the program entitled Think. Act. Lead: A Path to Each Student’s Story. Focused on various activities to improve students’ advising, mentoring and preparation for post-collegiate experiences, the project involves the coordinated efforts of three divisions of the college (Academic Affairs, Student Affairs, and Institutional Advancement).  This session will feature the project as a case study for successful proposal preparation for foundation support.    Successful leveraging of support from senior leadership, building of cross-institutional collaboration (including collaboration between Sponsored Projects and Corporate and Foundation Relations), preparing for a site visit, and securing additional project support will be highlighted.  

Content level: Basic

Learning objectives:

  1. Apply knowledge in aligning funding sources with institutional priorities.
  2. Prepare for site visits from funders.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Bonnie Troupe, Director of Academic Development, Stonehill College

W206: Let's Talk About the Common Rule Revisions: What's It All About?

The common rule regulations haven’t been updated in over 30 years. The revisions are intended to modernize how human subjects research is conducted today. Many of the proposed changes will impact the conduct of research operations, from implementation to completion. How are we as research professionals supposed to face the operational challenges that lie ahead in a clear and consistent manner? This session will provide an overview of the proposed changes as well as provide some tips and guidance that can be taken back to the workplace. 

Content level: Intermediate

Learning objectives:

  1. Know what the key changes are in the common rule revisions.
  2. Have an understanding of how those revisions will affect them in their workplace. 

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Carlotta Rodriguez, MS, CIP, CHRC, Director, Rutgers University