Sponsored Programs Planning, Development and Deliveries (SP)

This track relates to the development and delivery of sponsored programs. Topics may include: how to develop collaborative partnerships with industry, government and non-profit sectors; identifying strategies in developing public-private partnerships; institutional capacity building, including supply-side partnerships; faculty, positioning; effective grant writing techniques; the role of the research administrator in sponsored programs development; diversifying funding sources;  communication strategies in sponsored programs development; and organizational and team structures to support successful program development.

Monday, March 19, 2018

M202: Shared Services for Research Administration: Support for Faculty and Increased Compliance
Monday, March 19, 2018 - 11:00am to 12:15pm

Content level: Intermediate

The increased complexity and changing nature of research administration led us to evaluate the models we use institutionally to provide services to faculty.  This session will look at Yale’s approach to regionalizing research administration services for academic and non-academic departments.  Our organization, Faculty Research Management Services, seeks to raise the level of service to Principal Investigators while increasing compliance and mitigating risk.   This session will review how the current model was designed and implemented on our campus, provide the challenges and successes during the transition, and provide an opportunity to have a discussion about all aspects of this model.

Learning objectives:

  1. Evaluate the benefits and challenges associated with implementing this model.
  2. Identify best practices for design, branding and implementation.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Joanne Bentley, MBA, Director, Yale University

M302: Your Research Staff, Your Research Tools All Drive Your Research Outcomes
Monday, March 19, 2018 - 2:15pm to 3:30pm

Content level: Basic

After identifying several academic department challenges including competing priorities, turnover, lack of training, HR issues, audit issues, and lack of development plans, JHU leadership formed a research work group to address these concerns. With the large size of our decentralized institution, we developed four subcommittees to concentrate on each category- HR, training, metrics, and recruitment.  The subcommittee with an immediate impact was the training committee with their formation of a Fundamentals of Sponsored Programs Boot Camp. We will discuss the development and lessons learned based on our experiences. 

Learning objectives:

  1. Leveraging existing internal resources to standardize the research administration workforce. 
  2. Identifying problems and Driving improvements for common grant management issues. 

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Alexander Galea, Associate Administrator, Johns Hopkins University
Matthew Zeback, Senior Grants and Contracts Analyst, Johns Hopkins University

M402: Assessing a Team's Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats
Monday, March 19, 2018 - 3:45pm to 5:00pm

Content level: Intermediate

Identifying the Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats (SWOT) of a team is essential to any successful business. Research Administrators (RAs) can apply the same method to begin a comprehensive assessment of their office or department. Many RAs face similar external threats with ever-changing funding landscapes and government regulations. However, capitalizing on strengths can help a team mitigate potential threats. Weaknesses often highlight areas for opportunities. A SWOT analysis can be a productive exercise to do with a team and serve as a catalyst for growth. The speakers will describe how a SWOT analysis can be an effective team engagement activity, share their experiences, walk through interactive exercises with the audience, and provide RAs with tools on how to conduct not only the analysis with their teams, but also how to act upon the results.

Learning objectives:

  1. Describe what a SWOT analysis is and the methods to effectively conduct a SWOT analysis.
  2. Develop a strategy to analyze a team's strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats specific to a research administration environment.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Jennifer E. Woodward, PhD, Vice Chancellor for Research Operations, University of Pittsburgh
Laura Kingsley, MPH, CRA, Senior Associate Director, University of Pittsburgh 

Tuesday, March 20, 2018

T102: Common Negotiation Issues in Sponsored Research Agreements
Tuesday, March 20, 2018 - 9:30am to 10:45am

Content level: Basic

Our presentation will touch on a number of issues administrators encounter when reviewing and negotiating sponsored awards. Depending on the specifics of the project, certain regulations and requirements can have a huge impact on an organization's ability to comply with the terms of an agreement, and their ability to pursue the researchers’ objectives. We will address a wide range of topics including grants, subawards, data use agreements, and specific concerns such as intellectual property, indemnification, confidentiality, and international collaborations, among others.

Learning objectives:

  1. Recognize different considerations involved in the review of research agreements, as well as non-funded agreements.
  2. Develop specific requirements, and more general terms and conditions, based on the purpose of the research project.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Rachel Talentino, JD, Grants & Contracts Officer, Harvard University
Carolina Harvey, Grants & Contracts Officer, Harvard University
Melissa Maher, Manager, Subawards, Harvard University

T105: Research Support Models to Strengthen and Enhance Your Organization
Tuesday, March 20, 2018 - 9:30am to 10:45am

Content level: Advanced

Effective research support models are critical to the success of both investigators and the entities in which they carry out their research.  The challenge for many institutions and investigators is the ability to find and retain professional, qualified staff that understand the unique aspects of sponsored research while providing top tier customer service.  Opportunities for improved service models for investigators are often discouraged by institutional culture, politics or inflexible organizational mentalities, but most often opportunities are not pursued because people are just not encouraged to think ‘outside the box’.

This session will provide examples of different approaches to service models that have been implemented at Partners Healthcare, including integrated department and central positions, temporary hourly staffing and cohort training.  These models have benefited the investigators and the institutions by providing a higher level of quality service, professional development opportunities to employees, and improved compliance. The session will also provide transparency into the impetus for these models and key factors to consider in order to successfully implement them at your organization.
 

Learning objectives:

  1. Understand how to initiate similar models at your organization.
  2. Understand how these models can strengthen organizations engaged in sponsored research, meet the needs of investigators and offer professional development opportunities to staff. 

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Andrew Chase, Vice President, Research Management and Research Finance, Partners HealthCare
Eleni Ryals, Corporate Director, Research Management/Research Support Services, Partners HealthCare

T202: Team Science and Collaborative Grants
Tuesday, March 20, 2018 - 11:00am to 12:15pm

Content level: Intermediate

As modern research methods have become more specialized and the true complexity of today’s most pressing health issues and diseases is revealed, collaborations among scientists trained in different fields have become essential for exploring and tackling these problems. This specialization of research methods has made interdependence, joint ownership, and collective responsibility between and among scientists near requirements. Most researchers will find themselves asked to participate on or lead a research team at some point in their careers. As the focus on research teams sharpens, questions are emerging about what constitutes a successful team and how research teams can maximize their effectiveness and experiences. Not every team is successful—some are able to achieve only some of their goals, or fail and dissolve. Other teams are highly successful—reaching and often exceeding their recognized goals and creating positive experiences for team members and the institutions that support them. Why is this the case? What constitutes a successful research team? Why do some research teams succeed while others do not? What factors maximize a research team’s productivity or effectiveness? How can research teams be best recognized, evaluated, and rewarded?  This session will explore all of these issues and offer strategies for research administrators to work effectively in this collaborative environment. 

Learning objectives:

  1. Describe strategies for working effectively with collaborative research teams.
  2. Apply these strategies to developing complex collaborative grant applications.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Marjorie Piechowski, PhD, Emerita Director of Research Support, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

T302: Anatomy of Policy Implementation
Tuesday, March 20, 2018 - 2:15pm to 3:30pm

Content level: Intermediate

We would all like to think that with all the talk of reform at the Federal level, that we should be looking forward to fewer regulations and unfunded mandates but the reality is, that is probably just wishful thinking.  Institutions must interpret new regulatory mandates, develop policy and procedures, and identify the roles and responsibilities for compliance.  These are sometimes daunting charges.  This session will provide an overview of the process using a case study implementation to illustrate the steps that should be taken to effectively meet the regulatory compliance requirement.   

Learning objectives:

  1. Identify the parties who may have a role in meeting compliance requirements and designate roles and responsibilities for compliance.
  2. Conduct a fit/gap analysis to identify data or system needs to facilitate an efficient process.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Susan Wyatt Sedwick, PhD, CRA, Senior Consultant, Attain, LLC
 

T402: Perspectives of Central vs. Departmental Research Offices
Tuesday, March 20, 2018 - 3:45pm to 5:00pm

Content level: Intermediate

The presenters will discuss their experiences regarding the differences between department and central research administration. The session will cover each unit's concerns, regarding allowability, allocation, consistency, and compliance. Additionally, the session will highlight differences between major research institutions and lessor research institutions, including PUIs.

Learning objectives:

  1. Differentiate the perspectives of central vs departmental research administration.
  2. Integrate the "other's" rationales into your work processes.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Rene Hearns, MPA, CRA, Assistant Director/Study Coordinator/Budget Analyst, US Department of Veterans Affairs Cleveland Medical Center
Kate McCormick, CRA, Senior Grant Administrator, Suffolk University

Wednesday, March 21, 2018

W102: Winning the Marathon: Effective Award Management from Start to Finish
Wednesday, March 21, 2018 - 9:15am to 10:30am

Content level: Basic

Much like preparing to run a marathon, effective award management is a labor intensive process that requires acute attention to detail. Without the right tools and knowledge, it can be a grueling process that can seem overwhelming and unmanageable. To ensure attendees have a positive and confident perspective of award management throughout the process, we have identified five key components.  Our workshop focuses on how to successfully “run” an award by: possessing a clear interpretation of the sponsor’s intentions in the budget narrative; preparing reconciliations; utilizing pivot tables; analyzing the importance of one on one meetings; and formulating more accurate budget forecasts.  Each of these tools are necessary to better prepare participants to successfully complete the marathon, conquering the “race” from start to finish.

Learning objectives:

  1. Have the tools to successfully manage an award from start to finish.
  2. Possess the tools to effectively articulate the financial components of the award management process with stakeholders. 

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Rachel Hayes, Business Operations Manager, Arizona State University 
Daysi Ardon, Business Operations Specialist, Arizona State University 
Zachary Wicklund, Fiscal Specialist, Arizona State University 
 

W103: We're Not in Kansas Anymore: Adapting to Other Sides of the Rainbow
Wednesday, March 21, 2018 - 9:15am to 10:30am

Content level: Intermediate

Research Administrators often change jobs from one university to another, or even one department to another.  The rules of Research Administration may be the same, but how does one successfully navigate the differing cultures, faculty and administrative expectations, as well as resources (or lack of)?  Add the dimension of size and Carnegie Classification to the mix and it’s an entirely different (and sometimes unrecognizable) ballgame.  This session is a study of three journeys, and the perspectives, expectations, challenges, and lessons learned when going from a state flagship Research Intensive University (R1) to a regional comprehensive Primarily Undergraduate Institution (PUI), from an R1 to a small research institution, and from a PUI to a PUI with a new supervisor with R1 experience.   And if that isn’t enough, we’ll add implementing a new Electronic Research Administration tool to our list of changes and challenges.  Hang on -- the weather could get rough!

Learning objectives:

  1. Recognize challenges that come with change and identify effective solutions.
  2. Reflect on lessons learned from others and translate them for use in their own circumstance.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Teri Herberger, MSM, CRA, Director of Sponsored Programs, Salisbury University
Angela Richmond, Director, Office of Research Administration and Advancement, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science
Beth Walsh, Grants Specialist, Salisbury University

W202: Metrics that Matter: Assessing Workflow and Staffing
Wednesday, March 21, 2018 - 10:45am to 12:00pm

Content level: Intermediate

This session will demonstrate how the Pediatric Ontario (Oncology) Protocol Assessment Level (Peds-OPAL) can be adapted as a mechanism for measuring complexity beyond its incipient use for measuring study complexity associated with research coordinator workload.  This session will provide insights on how assigning complexity scoring can assist is balancing workload, assessing reasonable workloads and justifying new staffing associated with new research foci and strategic goals to increase research funding.   Using complexity ratings can help managers more accurately balance workload and assign proposals and awards.   Complexity scoring can provide valuable metrics for making the case for additional staffing in response or in anticipation of growth in research but to also make the case for increasing salaries to help in retention of experienced staff.  Note:  This topic could be effective in a 75 minutes discussion setting.

Learning objectives:

  1. Develop a ratings matrix for proposals, awards and clinical studies applicable to their institution.
  2. Understand how to use workflow matrix to justify additional positions and increase salaries to retain experience staff.

Prerequisites: None

Speaker(s):

Susan Wyatt Sedwick, PhD, CRA, Senior Consultant, Attain, LLC
Michele Vaughan, BS, CCRP, Director, Clinical Research Operations for Hem/Onc/BMT Director, NEXT Consortium, Nationwide Children's Hospital