Concurrent Sessions

Concurrent Sessions

Monday, April 4 | 9:30 - 10:30 AM

M101: The Art of Delivery: Effective Communication with Your PI

Effective communication and strong relationships between the faculty and administrative staff are key to successful and painless management of a research grant. Administrators have plenty of stories involving stressful meetings with faculty - the PI of a study becomes overwhelmed with the financial and administrative management of grants, and in turn the administrator becomes frustrated when it feels like the faculty simply "don't want to listen". The goal for this workshop is to provide an informal conversation between attendees to share real-life examples, learn the best ways to tailor their communication style by identifying the needs of their faculty or department, and improving their communications and confidence in their position and responsibility.

Content Level: Intermediate

Speaker(s):
Vanessa Rook, Research Administrator, Shock Trauma and Anesthesiology Research Center, University of Maryland, Baltimore

M102: Best Practices for Award Transfers

When a Principal Investigator (PI) moves from one institution to another, more often than not, existing awards will transfer to the new institution with approval of the original institution and the sponsor. These award transfers can become an arduous process with long delays that can negatively affect the PI’s ability to continue the research project uninterrupted. However, if research administrators anticipate transfers and work proactively and collaboratively, we can make the process efficient and develop lasting positive relationships with all involved. Institutional policies and procedures that encourage and support this approach enable administrators to better facilitate the process and responsiveness to the increasingly collaborative research environment and growing faculty workforce mobility.

Content Level: Intermediate

Speaker(s):
Bella DiFranzo, Senior Consultant, Attain Partners; Rady Rogers, Associate Director, Research Administration & Finance Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University; Geraldine Pierre, Sponsored Research Administration Consultant

M103: The 3 Es – Equity, Engagement and Equality

Equality is giving everyone a pair of shoes. Equity is making sure everyone has a pair of shoes that fit them. Engagement means considering the type of shoe that the individual or group has an interest in wearing. At SRAI, we are considering the 3 E's and how to maximize access and engagement with our larger community. Please join us for a robust discussion on these topics, the future of the 3 E's in our profession, and the role SRAI can play in helping realize that future.

Content Level: Advanced

Speaker(s):
Karen Mitchell, Assistant Vice President, Temple University; Marchon Jackson, Director of Sponsored Program Accounting and Compliance, University of Maryland; Marcos Garza, Director of Medical Finance, University of Miami; Robert McTear, Director of Research Administration, New York University School of Medicine; Beverly Morehouse, Senior Sponsored Projects Specialist, Stephen F. Austin State University

M104: Research Security: It's More than Disclosure Management and Export Controls

The January 2021 release of National Security Presidential Memorandum-33 and the corresponding release by the Office of Science and Technology Policy of "Recommended Practices for Strengthening the Security and Integrity of America's Science and Technology Research Enterprise" signal coming new requirements for the management of research security at research institutions. This session will cover the elements of a research security program and how leveraging existing institutional resources may accomplish compliance while minimizing institutional costs in establishing a research security program.


Content Level: Intermediate

Speaker(s):
Elizabeth Peloso, Associate Vice President & Associate Vice Provost, University of Pennsylvania; Jessica Buchanan, Ph.D., Director of Export Compliance, University of Pennsylvania; Lisa Nichols, Ph.D., Senior Director of Sponsored Programs, University of Pennsylvania

M105: Department of Defense and Mission Agency Funding Overview

The Department of Defense (DoD) funds almost half of all federally sponsored basic science research at US academic institutions, but new faculty and research administrators can be intimidated. This concurrent session will provide an overview of DoD research funding in terms of types of research, types of contracts, and types of funding. The differences between mission agencies and other sponsors will be explored. We’ll discuss how to find potential research opportunities with mission agencies and how that leads to PIs developing relationships with DoD program officers. We will discuss how DoD mission agencies review proposals and how that should affect the way in which proposals are developed for success with DoD. Finally, we'll discuss some common compliance issues that research administrators should be familiar with and how they affect proposal development.


Content Level: Basic

Speaker(s):
David Harrison, Senior Research Administrator for Proposal Development, Rochester Institute of Technology

Monday, April 4 | 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

M201: The Path to Yes: Connecting Through Improv

Research Administration is about relationships and soft skills just as much as it is about knowing the right policy or procedure. Being able to listen, find a yes in the no, and connect with who you are speaking with are valuable skills in any office. In this session we will talk about the lessons to be learned from improv and how improv can reduce stress. We will also play a few improv games.

Content Level: Basic

Speaker(s):
Karen Bone, Proposal Administrator, Florida Atlantic University

M202: Bridging the Gap: Post-award Begins in Pre-award

Whether you are pre-award or post-award, the grant life cycle involves a set of interrelated and connected actions. Actions taken in the pre-award stage, impact and can determine actions in the post-award stage. Attendees will learn how to pro-actively ensure post-award success by identifying and implementing small actions during proposal preparation, submission, and award acceptance. This interactive session will provide concrete examples of gaps in the award lifecycle and specifically discuss the small but important pre-award actions that could improve post-award processing and avoid costly headaches in the long run. Attendees will leave this session with action items they can share with colleagues for improved processes!


Content Level: Basic

Speaker(s):
Jose Alcaine, Director of Research Services/Affiliate Faculty in Foundations, Virginia Commonwealth University; Carey Reinicke, Associate Director for Grants and Contracts, School of Data Science, University of Virginia

M203: frAGILE: Lean Concepts in a Remote/Hybrid Workplace

Many institutions have implemented Lean/Agile strategies to facilitate workflow and continuous quality improvement. Being "lean" is not the same as practicing "Lean," a nuance that is often missed and can be exacerbated when staff are working remotely. A panel will address how their institutions utilize Lean/Agile tools successfully in their Remote/Hybrid workplaces to ensure that remote staff do not feel marginalized but valued for their productivity.

Content Level: Intermediate

Speaker(s):
Susan Sedwick, Senior Consulting Specialist, Attain Partners

M205: Same Goal, Different Paths: NIH and a Recipient Organization Talk About Grants

This interactive panel discussion will provide perspectives on non-financial transactions between the Recipient Organization - Department, School and Central Administration - and the NIH. We will cover topics from Just-In-Time to award close-out, and explore topics such as other support, prior approval requests, and close-out documentation from the viewpoints of the institution and the NIH. We will also discuss strategies for effective engagement among the PI, the NIH and the Institution.

Content Level: Basic

Speaker(s):
Debbie Pettitt, Senior Grants Management Officer, National Institutes of Health; Janet Simons, Director Research Policy, University of Maryland, Baltimore; Bill Hoffman, Research Administrator, University of Maryland, Baltimore-School of Dentistry; Elenora Levin, Administrator at Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Monday, April 4 | 1:30 - 2:30 PM

M301: Workplace Cultural Norms & Professionalism!

As workforce demographics shift and our new work norm emerges, workplace diversity inches closer to becoming a necessity, and cultural norms are changing rapidly to show a commitment to embracing differences and change that has gained momentum. Employees reap tangible and intangible benefits from workplace benefits, not the least of which include respect from co-workers, support from their organization to live and breathe diversity, in addition to challenging stale cultural norms that are no longer professionally accepted. Our organizations will grow and become stronger by recognizing the strengths gained by building a diverse and inclusive workplace. This session will unpack workplace cultural norms and professionalism that challenge diversity, equity, and inclusion awareness.

Content Level: Intermediate

Speaker(s):
Rashonda Harris, Director of Award Management and Post Award Services, University of Connecticut; Lamar K. Oglesby, Executive Director, Research Financial Services, Rutgers University; Debra Y. Murray, Associate Director Compliance and Cost Analysis, Sponsored Programs Accounting and Compliance (SPAC), University of Maryland

M302: Facilities & Administrative Costs: Understanding the Negotiation Process

From the first day, we entered the field of research administration, we’ve had the importance of facilities and administrative costs (aka F&A or indirect costs) drilled into us. We’ve heard terms such as F&A rates, facilities and administrative costs, cognitive agencies, cost pools, MTDC, and recovered F&A. We have it drilled into us that cost-share undermines the F&A rate. We know that facilities and administrative costs are an integral part of an institution’s funding profile and that these funds are needed to support the research infrastructure of our institution. We’ve undoubtedly been told that F&A represents costs that cannot be directly attributed to a specific project; the institution incurs them in support of research. But how much detail do we know about the negotiation of our institution’s F&A rate? In this session, we will dive into the details of the all-important F&A rate.

Content Level: Basic

Speaker(s):
Kim Read, Director, Business & Research Administration, University of South Florida

M303: How a Shared Service Organization Provides High Level Service to Faculty

The increased complexity and changing nature of research administration led us to evaluate the models we use institutionally to provide services to faculty. This session will look at Yale’s approach to regionalizing research administration services for academic and non-academic departments. Our organization, Faculty Research Management Services, seeks to raise the level of service to Principal Investigators while increasing compliance and mitigating risk. During this session we will discuss how the current model was designed and implemented on our campus, provide detailed examples of Pre and Post Award services to faculty and provide an opportunity to discuss all aspects of this model

Content Level: Intermediate

Speaker(s):
Joanne Bentley, Senior Director, Yale University; Kate Cotto, Manager-FRMS Post Award, Yale University; Kelly Snyder, Team Leader-FRMS Pre-Award, Yale University

M304: The Methodology Behind Risk and Control Self-Assessment

When we hear Research Integrity, some of the areas that come to mind are research misconduct, foreign influence, research security, and researcher issues. However, research integrity also focuses on operational risks and the effectiveness of controls within your organization. This session will take a look at the importance of conducting a control self-assessment to determine whether adequate controls exist and operate effectively to address the risks to the University.

Content Level: Intermediate

Speaker(s):
Gloria Greene, Assistant Vice President, Contracts and Grants, University of Alabama Huntsville

M305: NIH Reporter: What Can It Do for You?

This session shows how NIH Reporter is more than just a database of NIH funded research. We will show participants how to use NIH Reporter to find POs, study sections, who applied to what FOA, and comparative costs. You will be able to go back to your desk (or open your laptop) and use this tool immediately.

Content Level: Basic

Speaker(s):
Beth Brittan Powell, Director, Research Compliance Initiatives; Rebecca Hunsaker, Executive Director of Research Management; Stephanie F. Scribner, Research Coordinator, University of Maryland

Monday, April 4 | 3:00 - 4:00 PM

M401: Dealing with Difficult Faculty/Situations and the Importance of Self-Care

During this open discussion session, the presenter will present some of his own stories of navigating difficult situations, faculty and other challenges faced from coordinating grant proposals (both pre and post) with other University offices, sub-awardees, and sponsors. There will also be a brief discussion of self-care strategies to deal with job-related stress. This is meant to be an interactive session and the audience will also be invited to share their challenges and stories and discuss best practices on how to overcome these common pitfalls and obstacles.

Content Level: Basic

Speaker(s):
Michael Marino, Executive Director of Sponsored Projects, Long Island University

M402: Understanding the Term "Source Documentation", aka the Root of Solidifying Internal Controls

Provide participants with an overview of the importance of establishing, implementing, and assessing your internal controls as they relate to the transactional level detail and philosophical approaches to meeting the reasonableness, allowability, and allocability tests as well as research administration as a whole.

Content Level: Intermediate

Speaker(s):
Denise Clark, Associate Vice President for Research Administration, University of Maryland, College Park; Timothy Reuter, Senior Director, Post-Award Operations, Stanford University; Ann Holmes, Assistant Dean, Administration and Finance, Behavioral and Social Sciences, University of Maryland College Park

M403: A Model for Customer Service in Pre-Award Research Administration

Utilizing customer service data collected in a Pre-Award office, this workshop will review the results of the data collection and discuss how a customized customer model specifically designed for Pre-Award research administration can be utilized and is essential when planning meet growing demand in the changing landscape of research administration.

Content Level: Intermediate

Speaker(s):
Patrice Martin, Sponsored Projects Officer III, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

M404: Inherent COI and Common Compliance Risks for PI Founded Start-Ups

All In - join for an overview of the start-up process with an explanation of where grant and research compliance internal controls can exist. This presentation will provide information on navigating startups and university research from the perspective of grants administration and research compliance. Topics will include but not be limited to: (1) Restrictions on SBIR/STTR PI role; (2) PI using his or her lab to support their own company; (3) potential for the research to be viewed as biased or not objective.

Content Level: Basic

Speaker(s):
Kristen Schwendinger, Compliance Officer, George Washington University

M405: National Science Foundation (NSF) – Understanding the Proposal Process

Are you thinking about submitting a proposal to National Science Foundation (NSF) and not sure how to start or what might be required in the proposal? Or are you a Research Administrator who is new to the field or whose organization is looking at increasing submissions to NSF - do you need to learn some information to help understand NSF? Need some tips on how to avoid common issues and problems that result in a proposal being rejected for review or needing an update? Afraid of the upcoming closure of Fastlane as Research.gov becomes the only submission portal? Then this is the session for you! We'll review some important background information affecting proposals, the common tabs that entries are made in (or files loaded) and their requirements and overview the submission process. We'll close by discussing some info on actions like collaborative proposals, letters of intent, updates, withdrawals and revisions. We'll touch on avoiding submission issues and common problems throughout the session.

Content Level: Basic

Speaker(s):

Fran Stephens, Director, Pre-Award Services, The University of Oklahoma, Office of Research Services; Gina Hedberg, Executive Director, Office of Sponsored Projects Administration, University of South Alabama

Tuesday, April 5 | 8:00 - 9:00 AM - Round Tables

Round Table 1: Challenges with Accessing Sponsor Portals Involving Two-factor Authentication and Shared Accounts

Speaker(s):
Amy Shilling-Moakley, Grant Specialist/Research Information Coordinator at University of Oklahoma; Fran Stephens, Director, Pre-Award Services, The University of Oklahoma, Office of Research Services

Round Table 2: Remote and Hybrid Work

Speaker(s):
Mimi Davis, Grants and Contracts Manager, Campus Grants and Management Team, Duke University

Round Table 3: NIH - What’s In an RPPR

Speaker(s):
Debbie Pettitt, Senior Grants Management Officer, National Institutes of Health; Teri Pailen, Team Lead, National Institutes of Health

Round Table 4: What Are You Reading? -  Personal Development as Professional Development. 

Speaker(s):
Tania N. Johnson, Director of Sponsored Programs, Swarthmore College

Tuesday, April 5 | 9:30 - 10:30 AM

T101: Resolving Everyday Conflict

In our execution of our day-to-day responsibilities as Research Administrators, we come into contact with different persons, agencies or institutions. Usually, these stakeholders bring with them diverse views, experiences and culture which breeds a fertile ground for conflict. It is therefore not a matter of “if you will encounter a conflict but when you do.” When faced with conflicts, we can either avoid or approach it; and we can either become bitter or better depending on the option we have chosen in dealing with the conflicts. Regardless of how much you resist dealing with conflict, you must learn to effectively, lovingly and firmly navigate conflict between people created either by you or by others and conflict between entities. How you therefore deal with conflict can make the difference between a conducive and hostile work environment, a productive and unproductive employee and between increasing or decreasing our extramural funds.

Content Level:  Intermediate

Speaker(s):
Reuel Mebuin, Grants & Contracts Specialist, Rutgers University Newark 

T102: Cost Transfers

Cost transfers, what are they and why are they an important part of grants management? Cost transfers are best described as the process by which we reallocate expenses that were initially charged incorrectly. This session is designed at the basic level for the new departmental administrators based on the lessons learned from a departmental grants manager. Who is responsible for maintaining information, who is responsible for approval, and the importance of preparing cost transfers within the allowable time frame.  At each step of the process, the speakers will look at policies and procedures that ensure cost transfers are compliant with federal and institutional regulations

Content Level: Basic

Speaker(s):
Kimberly McKoy, Assistant Director for Pre-Award, College of Natural Resources, North Carolina State University; Pamela Montgomery, Assistant Director, John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute, Duke University

T103: The Post-submission Pre-award Review Process

Proposals are often prepared and submitted very close to the deadline. They are then filed away until the award is made even though there is a high probability that the budgets contain errors. This puts post-award administrators in the unenviable position of discovering these mistakes after the project start date which can lead to delays and unhappy Principal Investigators (PIs). This interactive session will examine the pre- to post-award progression and introduce attendees to a post-submission, pre-award review process.

Content Level: Basic

Speaker(s):
Dominic Esposito, Director of Sponsored Programs Administration, Farmingdale State College; Jerod Kersey, Senior Contract/Grant Administrator, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center

T104: Updates on Improper Influence Compliance

This session will update attendees on the latest developments in federal policy, enforcement actions and good compliance practices related to improper influence concerns arising from foreign, political and financial pressures.

Content Level: Intermediate

Speaker(s):
Susan Sedwick, Senior Consulting Specialist, Attain Partners

T105: NIH Update

Don’t miss this opportunity to hear about what is new and what is being developed within the National Institute of Health's (NIH) programs, policies, and budgets. In this comprehensive review, participants will learn about the newest policy updates and how their respective institutions may be impacted. Upon completion of the presentation, participants will have the opportunity to ask questions about new and existing policies and procedures. Topics include recent and upcoming changes to NIH policy, compliance requirements, and so much more!

Content Level: Basic

Speaker(s):
Kasima Garst, Systems Policy Analyst, National Institute of Health; Alesia Brody, Assistant Grants Compliance Officer, National Institute of Health; Adam Graham, Assistant Grants Policy Officer, National Institute of Health

Streamed via video/interactive

Tuesday, April 5 | 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

T201: Presenting at Research Administration Conferences: A "Go-To" Guide

No matter how comfortable you are with a subject matter or how senior a research administrator you are, presenting at research conferences is a daunting endeavor. This presentation is designed for anyone interested in presenting in the future but are looking for a plan for how to take that first leap into submitting a conference topic and planning your presentation accordingly. Topics to be discussed include how to come up with a topic, how to put together a presentation, and how to corral your resources to overall presentation success. Ideas for how to present your ideas in a methodical way, submission and presentation tips and tricks, along with some failures of my own during my previous attempts will give attendees a roadmap to success to get more involved in the larger research administration community.

Content Level: Basic

Speaker(s):
Nicholas Prieur, Research Process Senior Manager, University of Michigan

T202: Understanding Cost Share Basics

During the session we'll address some common questions about cost share - what it is, how cost principles impact it, the types of cost share, sources of cost share, how a sponsor can capture it, and how you can document it. How do different organizations support cost share or require different protocols to build a cost share package? What do you do when the sponsor pushes non-mandatory cost share, or a commitment is made accidentally? Have you ever had that 'what were they thinking?!? moment when looking at a cost share package? Let's share some educational stories about dealing with over commitment and determining the need for cost share. A session with lots of info, answers, and audience participation.

Content Level: Basic

Speaker(s):
Fran Stephens, Director, Pre-Award Services, The University of Oklahoma, Office of Research Services

T203: The Teleworking Experience: It’s All About Balance

COVID-19 has prompted all of us to examine and alter just about every part of our daily lives. Early on, we were faced with challenges that required quick, extreme decisions regarding working from home, educating our children from home, and adjusting to a much different lifestyle than most have ever experienced. Fast forward two years. While most schools have returned to in-person learning and we can enjoy public outings without mass closures, many institutions, corporations, and businesses have adapted to permanently offering hybrid and all-remote work options. We may be better adjusted to these new models, but we’re still faced with some of the same challenges that were presented early on. This session will discuss real-world scenarios and strategies to optimize teleworking and managing teleworkers, as well as how to maintain an ideal work-life balance.


Content Level: Basic

Speaker(s):
Beth Cammarn, CRA, Research Operations Manager, School of Health Professions, Administrator, Center for Recovery, Physical Activity, and Nutrition, University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston; Evan Roberts, Executive Director, Society of Research Administrators International

T204: Tipping Points in Research Misconduct Investigations

We will review the thornier issues that institutions face for inquiries, investigations, reporting, and potential litigation related to research misconduct. This presentation will briefly cover the legal cases that influence institution risk assessment in this area of compliance. Participants will learn different approaches to handle key points in the course of the regulated research misconduct process.

Content Level: Basic

Speaker(s):
Kristen Schwendinger, Compliance Officer, George Washington University

Tuesday, April 5 | 2:00 - 3:00 PM

T301: There Is No "I" in Team

We have participated in institutions, school, and activities that emphasize wining or being the top achiever. Many organizations have a structure that recognizes, compensates and promotes individual work against teamwork. A work culture where employees are compensated and celebrated solely for individual performance and contribution does not encourage teamwork. Instead, it fosters competition. This session will focus on building a culture of teamwork through collaboration and mutual respect for all team members.

Content Level: Basic

Speaker(s):
Gina Hedberg, Executive Director, Office of Sponsored Projects Administration, University of South Alabama; Gloria Greene, Assistant Vice Present, Contracts and Grants, University of Alabama; Cindy Morin, Senior Administrative and Business Manager, Johns Hopkins University

T302: A Review of the August 2020 Changes to the Uniform Guidance

In 2020 the Office of Management and Budget released changes to 2 CFR 200 - Uniform Administrative Requirements, Cost, Principles, and Audit Requirements for Federal Awards, commonly known as the Uniform Guidance. This session will review the changes and their potential impacts, with a focus on property, equipment, procurement standards, and compensation.

Content Level: Basic

Speaker(s):

Rebecca Hunsaker, Executive Director of Research Management, University of Maryland; Ann Holmes, Assistant Dean, Administration and Finance, Behavioral and Social Sciences, University of Maryland College Park

T303: Let’s Get in ReFormation

Change is always challenging. Change can be challenging whether faced with an office reorganization or an enterprise resource planning (ERP) implantation. In most cases, implementation seems to be imagined and long-term success out of reach. Change does not require proper management but rather mindful leadership. As leaders, we must implement, assess, adjust, reevaluate, and rearrange throughout the change process while understanding the impact it has on our employees. This workshop will focus on the multifaceted aspects and keys to effective long-term change leadership, followed by interactive sessions focused on best practices for leading successful change in the areas of people, process, and technology.

Content Level: Intermediate

Speaker(s):
Rashonda Harris, Director of Award Management and Post Award Services, University of Connecticut; Debra Y. Murray, Associate Director Compliance and Cost Analysis, Sponsored Programs Accounting and Compliance (SPAC), University of Maryland

T304: Research Compliance Review and Protections

The Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) covers a broad spectrum of research ethics, integrity, and compliance topics. Among them are Animal Welfare, Use of Human Subjects, Lab Safety, and Conflicts of Interest. All of these research areas require oversight by an established research review or oversight committee and an accompanying administrative office and/or official(s). This session will focus on how these groups function and how they interact with grants management to ensure financial stewardship and research that is both ethical and compliant.

Content Level: Intermediate

Speaker(s):
Debra Schaller-Demers, Vice President, Research Outreach and Compliance, Memorial Sloan Kettering

T305: USDA-What’s the Big Till?

The US Department of Agriculture may be one of the most complex federal departments for sponsored programs administrators to interact with. The Department is collection of 29 agencies and offices that touches the lives of all people in the US and across the globe every day. Each individual USDA agency has their own proposal and award processes making submissions and award management no easy task. The speakers will cover the basics about a) how USDA interacts with universities, b) the types of agencies and programs that provide funding for research, extension and education activities, c) the elements of a successful NIFA proposal, and d) application and review processes and post-award reporting. From the perspective of a land-grant university, the speakers will discuss their experiences with select USDA agencies (including NIFA, Forest Service, Agricultural Research Service, Rural Development, etc), mandatory cost-sharing requirements and indirect costs recovery limitations.

Content Level: Basic

Speaker(s):
William C. Helmrath, MSM, CRA, Sr. Research Administrator, Department of Neurobiology, Harvard Medical School; Liz Hebert, Research Coordinator, University of Tennessee Knoxville

Tuesday, April 5 | 3:30 - 4:30 PM

T401: Assessing and Combating Impostor Syndrome in Research Administration

Impostor syndrome is a common phenomenon among high achieving professionals, academics, and students. Despite its prevalence, many people are unaware of its impact in the workplace. Perhaps you or your colleagues exhibit signs of impostor syndrome. Do you play down your achievements as some sort of luck or chance occurrence? Do you wonder how you have your job and feel unqualified? Do you always apologize for mistakes or for not knowing something? Do you have a fear of failure or worry about being exposed as a fraud? This session will explore this phenomenon in practice and will help research administrators recognize its signs. An interactive exercise will also be used to facilitate discussion.

Content Level: Intermediate

Speaker(s):
Jose Alcaine, Director of Research Services/Affiliate Faculty in Foundations, Virginia Commonwealth University

T402: Voucher, Invoices or FFR's Oh my...Choosing the Right Financial Trail

Understand the overall FFR process • Grants and Contracts Invoice process • Comprehend the role of both Research Administration and Finance • Be Familiar with the timelines associated with processing both FFR’s and Final Invoices

Content Level: Intermediate

Speaker(s):
Laura Scarantino, Assistant Vice President, University of Maryland, Baltimore

T403: Research Administration 101: Training the New Research Administrator

So, you've hired a new employee - the first day is easy - you show them around, orient them on office and institution policies, make sure they have their accesses. But what do you do with your newbie on day 2? These sessions will focus on how to develop a training program for your new Research Administrator (the focus is proposal submission but this can be adapted to any facet of Research Administration). We will review adult learning principles, learn how to identify training needs and objectives, and see how to develop training exercises. There will be opportunity for discussion and sharing of ideas.

Content Level: Intermediate

Speaker(s):
Shayne Sims, Assistant Managing Director, Texas Tech University

T404: Critical Thinking as the Go-to Tool for Making Ethical Decisions

Ethics is based on our implicit social contract of what is right and wrong, of what is considered acceptable in our profession. Ethics covers that gray area between I think is a great idea and no way that’s illegal. We routinely make decisions in research administration that involve ethics, and most of these we don’t have to stop and think about. We know that we can’t use data from a participant that has withdrawn from a study. We know that we can’t park expenses on one grant to cover a shortfall on another. However, how do we handle those murky areas where the answer isn’t straightforward? This is where we employ critical thinking. Critical thinking, analyzing and synthesizing information to make a sound decision, is a skill we each need to develop as research administrators.

Content Level: Intermediate

Speaker(s):
Kim Read, PhD, CRA, Director, Business & Research Administration, University of South Florida

T405: Ready, Set, Go

The difference between successful proposals and a resubmission often hinges upon information that can be gleaned in a phone call or visit with an agency sponsor. Yet it is often difficult to get PIs to make these calls. This session helps administrators prepare for assisting PIs with early sponsor contact, to include preliminary research on the program, potential questions to ask, and what to avoid.

Content Level: Basic

Speaker(s):
Charna Howson, Director, Sponsored Programs, Appalachian State University

Wednesday, April 6 | 9:30 - 10:30 AM

W101: Generational Communication - Speaking to Those Before & After You

This session aims to discuss the various methods of communications and the differences between the generations currently in the workplace. We will talk about methods of communication, who we communicate with as research administrators, and preferred methodologies between generations.

Content Level: Basic

Speaker(s):

John Hedberg, Contracts and Grants Manager, Dauphin Island Sea Lab; Gloria Green, Assistant Vice President Contracts and Grants, Office of Sponsored Programs, The University of Alabama in Huntsville

W102: Allowable, Reasonable, and Allocable: Defining “It Depends”

This session will discuss how we define allocable and reasonable at our institutions. Be prepared to discuss your own decisions metrics in determining reasonableness. The discussion will highlight and discuss unique situations in determining the allowableness of costs. We invite participants to join the conversation about the current audit environment and findings related to allocable, reasonable, and allowable.

Content Level: Intermediate

Speaker(s):

Rashonda Harris, Director of Award Management and Post Award Services, University of Connecticut; Lamar K. Oglesby, Executive Director, Research Financial Services, Rutgers University

W103: Human Resources Management and Best Practices for the Department Administrator

This session will cover all aspects of Human Resources Management for the Department Administrator. This session will explore all pre-employment processes and best practices for the Administrator to get highly qualified candidates into their workplace. This session will also cover various payroll and equity issues that the Department Administrator may encounter. This will be a very interactive session between the participants and presenter and use various "what is wrong with this case study scenarios" to get everyone discussing how Human Resources Management is practiced at various Universities/Institutes. The session will also cover hot topics such as grievance/conflict resolution, VISA/International worker issues, Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), performance evaluations, mentoring, Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), on-boarding and supervision styles/issues.
  • Use best practices and case studies to assist the Department Administrator become a more effective manager.
  • Understand Human Resource Management issues more clearly and how these issues are resolved by various Universities/Institute.
Content Level: Basic

Speaker(s):

Bill Hoffman, Research Administrator, University of Maryland, Baltimore-School of Dentistry; Elenora Levin, Administrator at Albert Einstein College of Medicine

W105: NIH Grants Management Specialist....What Do We Do?

This panel session will cover the responsibilities of the grants management specialist (GMS), Team Lead (TL) and grants management officer (GMO) from different Institutes/Centers within NIH. Participants will be able to gain better insight into how the different IC's within NIH operate. This is a great opportunity to get answers to the questions such as "Why are you denying this request when XYZ Institute approved the same request on another award?"

Content Level: Basic

Speaker(s):

Debbie Pettitt, Senior Grants Management Officer, National Institutes of Health; Teri Pailen, Team Lead, National Institutes of Health; Victoria Matthews, Grants Management Specialist, National Institutes of Health; Artisha Wright, OTA Lead Agreement Specialist, National Institutes of Health

Wednesday, April 6 | 10:45 - 11:45 AM

W201: Making a Difference in Your Current Role

This interactive workshop will discuss ways to become more effective in your department and when you are working with other departments, faculty, and staff to complete your job as a research administrator. Searching for meaning and purpose in your work lives can be challenging at times. This session can assist you in finding your value in your organization.

Content Level: Basic

Speaker(s):

Kimberly McKoy, Assistant Director for Pre-Award, College of Natural Resources, North Carolina State University; Pamela Montgomery, Assistant Director, John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute, Duke University

W202: The Ins and Outs of Subrecipient Monitoring

Subrecipient monitoring is a requirement of receiving Federal funding. In addition, auditors are increasingly looking for evidence of subrecipient monitoring. This session will discuss the subrecipient monitoring requirements of the Uniform Guidance, the parties responsible for subrecipient monitoring at an institution, and best practices/tools for subrecipient monitoring. We will also discuss subrecipient monitoring under non-Federal awards. Case studies/real life examples will be utilized during this session.

Content Level: Basic

Speaker(s):

Jill A. Frankenfield, Associate Director, Office of Research Administration, University of Maryland, College Park; Rebecca Hunsaker, Executive Director of Research Management, College of Behavioral & Social Sciences, University of Maryland, College Park

W204: Research and Collaboration Strained through the Sieve of Export Controls

Our institutions engage in fundamental research -- basic and applied research, the results of which are published and shared broadly within the scientific community. In 1985, a National Security Decision Directive was issued to codify this concept, so we’re good. Right? Not necessarily. Consider recent headlines. September 2021, a former University of Miami assistant professor was arrested and charged with allegedly shipping genetic sequencing equipment to the Iranian military. February 2021, Princeton University settled with the Bureau of Industry and Security’s allegations of 37 occasions they exported strains and recombinants of animal pathogens. These are just a couple of recent examples, so clearly, there is more at play than fundamental research. We operate under a broad umbrella of export control laws that govern what information, material, or services must be licensed by the government to be released to foreign nationals. A foreign national is not a citizen of the United States, a lawful permanent resident, or a refugee granted asylum. This definition includes corporations, business associations, partnerships, societies, trusts, etc. In this session, we will review the bodies of law and regulatory/enforcement agencies that govern export control to navigate export control issues and mediate our practices.

Content Level: Basic

Speaker(s):

Kim Read, Director, Business & Research Administration, University of South Florida

W205: NSF Update

This session will inform participants about NSF proposal and award policies and procedures, agency priorities, and advances with proposal submission modernization and Research.gov.

Content Level: Basic

Speaker(s):
Jeremy A. Leffler, Outreach Specialist, Policy Office, Division of Institution & Award Support, Office of Budget, Finance & Award Management, National Science Foundation